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Full text of "Annual report"

ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 



V 





1977 



Ipswich f ||c L?br»i 

Ipswich, Massed 



THE SOUTH PARISH HOUSE 

Alice Keenan 

"... .And transfer was made by Daniel Cogswell and others to the Committee of the South 
Parish, November 28, 1836. The Meeting House was built in 1837 and dedicated on January 
1, 1838. The old Meeting House built in 1747 stood directly in front of the present building, 
though the roadway passed between it and the dwelling house." Thus recorded the 
Reverend Thomas Franklin Waters in his monumental work, "Ipswich in the Mass. Bay 
Colony." An historian dedicated to exhaustive research, the Reverend Waters also served 
as Pastor of the South Church from 1879 to 1909 when he became Pastor Emeritus. 

Limited space simply cannot allow for the telling of the dramatic, bitter and long struggle 
of the Petitioners for Separation from the First or Mother Church in 1747; its reason best 
lost, perhaps, in the mists of time. The ancient Berry's, Appleton's, Choate's, Wade's and 
Manning's well earned their "Glorious Church, not having a spot or wrinkle or any such 
thing," to quote from their Covenant. 

The old Meeting House was promptly torn down and the dwelling that stood on the site of 
the new Meeting House was moved down County Road where it still serves as a comfortable 
home. The new church, elegantly columned, was built next to the equally imposing Heard 
mansion. Frugal Yankee's that they were, they saved the old pulpit, so laboriously carved 
by Abraham Knowlton Jr. who, carried away in his craft, neglected his health and died 
before he could finish his masterpiece. The pulpit was moved into the new basement Vestry, 
which in time became so damp it was abandoned and a new Vestry built west of the Heard 
manse where it stood until 1886, when it was sold and moved to Hammatt Street where it 
still stands. 

The Reverend Waters tells us that a grand period of prosperity followed. The spacious 
center gallery contained a "great choir", swelled undoubtedly by the musical presence of 
the famed Miss Mary Lyon and her pupils from the Ipswich Female Seminary who boarded 
in the old Swasey Tavern across the way. An organ soon replaced the bass-viol, clarionet 
and flute, more befitting to a congregation consisting of families of wealth and influence. 

In 1899 the steeple was struck by lightning and the old bell destroyed. The fire proved to 
be a blessing in disguise, however, for the graceful lines of the original steeple were 
reproduced — have been altered a few years before — and a new bell was donated by Mrs. 
Elizabeth Brown. 

In time the congregation dwindled, and in 1922 the First and South Church merged, after a 
separation of 165 years. The church became the South Parish House and was used for a 
myriad of activities; social, charitable and religious. The South Parish Players presented a 
series of sparkling productions that are still fondly remembered, and for a time a bowling 
alley in the basement was a popular attraction. 

In 1971 the First Church decided to sell the South Parish House and it was eventually 
purchased by the Ipswich Heritage Trust, a non-profit organization formed to preserve the 
historic and architectural treasures of old Ipswich. The building was sold to the Friends of 
Ipswich Youth, who in turn leased the Parish House to the Youth Commission as a Teen 
Drop-In Center. 

On a bitter December night in 1977 the South Parish House was destroyed by fire, and the 
once jewel-like structure that watched over the South Green for 140 years was no more. 

Perhaps what is left, buried under the snows, will somehow, phoenix-like, rise from the 
ashes. In Ipswich one always hopes for the almost impossible — just as they did in 1747. 



photo by Harris Smith/Ipswich Today 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1977 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees . 3 

Annual Town Meeting 6 

Operating Budget General Government .... 7 

Board of Selectmen 29 

Town Manager 30 

Assessors Office 32 

Building Inspector 32 

Cemetery Dept 33 

Civil Defense 34 

Collection - Treasury Division 34 

Conservation Commission 35 

Council on Aging 36 

Dog Officer 36 

Elec. Light Dept 37 

Essex County Mosquito Control Project ...38 

Fire Dept 39 

Government Study Com 39 

Harbors 40 

Historical Comm 41 

Ipswich Housing Authority 43 

Industrial Development Commission 45 

Landfill 46 

Planning Board 46 

Police Dept 47 



Police Station Study Committee 48 

Public Library 48 

Public Works Dept 50 

Recreation - Parks Dept 53 

Ipswich School Committee 55 

Superintendent of Schools.. 56 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 59 

High School 59 

High School Graduates 60 

Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 62 

Winthrop School 62 

Burley - Shatswell Schools 63 

Director of Curriculum 64 

Pupil Personnel Services 65 

Enrollment Charts 66 

Shellfish Dept 67 

Town Counsel 67 

Town Clerk 68 

Veterans' Services 70 

Water/Sewer Dept 71 

Youth Commission 72 

Zoning Board of Appeals 73 

Deaths 74 

Ipswich at a Glance 76 



Printing & binding by 
ROWLEY PRINTING, INC. 

ROWLEY, MASS. 



ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND 

COMMITTEES 



CONSTABLE 

John J. Michon Sr. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Elected At Town Meeting 



ELECTED 



1978 



Lawrence J. Pszenny, Ch 


1978 


Edward L. Nagus 


1979 


George H.W. Hayes II 


1980 


Appointed By Moderator 




John Griffin 


1978 


William Craft 


1979 


Mary P. Conley 


1980 


Appointed by Selectmen 




George Tsoutsouras 


1978 


Thomas Emery 


1979 


James D. Smyth 


1980 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 




John G. Thatcher, Jr., Ch 


1978 


Arthur Goodfellow 


1979 


Stanley Eustace 


1980 


Arthur B. Weagle 


1981 


James Carter/State 


1981 


Jane Bokron Director 


1982 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patricia Manning, Ch. 
Paul K. Gahm 
Ernest F. Brockelbank 
Richard A. Nylen 
Walter J. Pojasek 
Thomas L. Moscarillo 
Deanna S. Cross 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Merle R. Pimentel, Ch 
Adele C. Robertson 
John M. Pickard 
Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 
Norbert V. White 



1980 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1980 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Harold E. Shively 



1978 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



SI TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Robert H. Leet 

Ml TOWN ASSESSOR 

Varnum S. Pedrick 



1979 



1978 



Ml BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Herbert 1978 

Ml CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr. 

Ml DOG OFFICER 

Melvin Blaquiere 1978 

SI ELECTRIC MANAGER 

Alfred Tobiasz 1978 

Ml TOWN ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Theodore Mozdziez 

Ml FIRE CHIEF IN CHARGE 

Melvin A. Bowen 

Ml TOWN COUSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 1978 



Ml HARBORMASTER 

Pete George 1978 

Ml HEALTH AGENT 

Edwin Bronk 1978 

Ml LIBRARIAN 

Eleanor Crowley 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 

Armand Brouillette 

Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION-PARKS DIRECTOR 



TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 



James H. Daly 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Charles Gianakakis 

Ml TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 

SI TEASURER/COLLECTOR 

George C. Mourikas 

Ml YOUTH DIRECTOR 

Cathleen McGinley 

1980 



1980 
1980 
1978 

1980 



APPOINTED 
BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Varnum S. Pedrick 
William P. Lewis 
John D. Heaphy 

M CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Leon B. Turner, Ch 
Nicholas Markos 
Gordon C. Player 

M CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Dir. 
Robert D. O'Meara, Assistant 



S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

John C. Vincent, Jr. 1978 

Harold F. Balch 1978 

Leland Carter 1978 

Cornelius Cleary 1978 

James C. McManaway, Jr. 1978 

Robert K. Weatherall 1978 

Doris Greenlaw 1978 

Margaret D. Ferrini 1978 

Donald Whiston 1978 

James Berry 1978 

M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Alexander A. Sweenie, Jr., Ch 1978 

Carol Grimes 1978 

Pattie T. Hall 1978 

Sarah L. Weatherall 1979 

Costos Tsoutsouris 1979 

Jack B. Johnstone 1980 

David R. Knowlton 1980 

S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Virginia Cawthron Poulen, Ch 1978 

Helen Drenth 1978 

Frank W. Kellie, Sr. 1978 

Percy Cheverie 1979 

Betty Pelham 1979 

Harold Bo wen 1980 

Winfred Hardy 1980 

M ECONOMIC & INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Paul R. Beswick 1978 

Peter W. Williamson 1979 

Alfred Castantini 1979 

Stephen L. Dietch 1981 

Alfred Benedetto 1979 

Bruce F. Paul 1980 

Richard F. Benedetto 1980 

James M. Nelson 1982 

Nathaniel Pulsifer 1982 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

Elton McCausland, Ch 1980 

Mark J. Apsey 1978 

Peter J. Owsiak 1979 





M 


ELECTRIC ADVISORY 




1978 




COMMITTEE 




1979 




Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr., Ch 


1978 


1980 




John A. Pechilis 


1978 






Arthur S. LeClair 


1978 






Lawrence R. Sweetser 


1978 


1979 




George H. Bouchard 


1978 


1978 




John H. Ward 


1978 


1980 




William C. Middlebrooks 


1978 




04 


GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 


1978 




George R. Mathey 




1978 




John M. Pickard 





William C. Wiggles worth 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Adele C. Robertson 
Loretta Dietch 
Carol Grimes 
Edwin H. Damon 
Merle R. Pimental 
Alice Shurcliff 

GOVERNMENT STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

Irving G. Small, Ch 
Jacob M. Israelson 
William H. Smith 
John Eby 
John J. Griffin 
Alfred D. Castantini 
Jessie Girard 
Mary Williamson 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



M 



Ml 



M6 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Paul J. Valcour, Ch 1980 
William C. Wigglesworth, M.D. 1978 

Edward B. Marsh, M.D. 1979 

Edwin Bronk, Agent 1978 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Ch 1979 

Barbara C. Emberley 1978 

Louise B. Hodgkins 1978 

George R. Mathey 1978 

Lovell Thompson 1979 

Alice Keenan 1979 

John C. Vincent, Jr. 1980 



S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Phyllis E. Bruce, Ch 1979 

Hubert A. Johnson 1978 

Daniel W. Poor, Jr. 1978 

Alice Keenan 1978 

Kathryn G. Klinger 1979 

Ann Durey 1979 

Louise W. Sweetser 1980 

Rev. Robert Dobson 1980 

Rae Paul 1980 
Ml Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 



Ml BELL RINGER 

Harold Bo wen 1978 

M MOSQUITO CONTROL 
COMMITTEE 

Alice Keenan, Ch 
Joan E. Oxner 
Lawrence E. Cummings 
Harold Balch 
Herbert E. Brack 
V. Byron Bennett 

M PLANNING BOARD 
John T. Beagen 
Jason A. Sokolov 
William L. Thoen 
George R. Mathey 
Roger A. Burke 

05 POLICE STATION STUDY 
COMMITTEE 
Appointed By Selectmen 

George Mathey, Ch 

Armand Brouilette 

Adele Robertson 

Appointed By Moderator 

Mary E. Williamson 

Roger A. Burke 

Appointed By Finance Committee 

Thomas Emery 

Edward L. Nagus 

M RECREATION & PARKS 
COMMITTEE 



Ml 



1978 




1978 




1978 


M 


1978 


Ml 


1978 




1978 




1980 




1978 




1979 




1981 




1982 


§ 



John H. Morrow, Ch 


1979 


Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 


1978 


Frederick Garand 


1978 


Thomas J. Flynn 


1980 


Charles J. Foley 


1980 


James H. Daly, Director 


1980 


REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 




Barbara J. Rousseau, Ch 


1979 


Daniel Markos 


1978 


John Kobos 


1980 


Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 


1978 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Edward Pacquin, Ch 1978 

Andrew Gianakakis 1978 

Thomas Dor man 1978 

James Carter 1978 

Joseph D. Kmiec 1978 

Philip Kent 1978 

Joseph Leadvaro (Lauderowicz) 1978 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Ben Collins 1979 

Loretta Dietch 1980 

George E. Howe 1981 

James C. Lahar 1982 

F. Dale Vincent 1983 



M 

E 

S 

M 

O 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



WATERWAYS STUDY COMMITTEE 

Joseph A. Navarro, Ch 1978 

Robert W. Parsons 1978 

Ruth S. Drown 1978 

Robert D. Todd, Jr. 1978 

Costos Tsoutsouris 1978 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen McGinley, Director 
Louis P. Geoffrion, Ch 
Donald Laterowicz 
Ann Horsman 
Charles H. Cooper 
Robert Wickstrom 
Bro. Robert Russell 
Joanne Burns 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Ch 
Sharon M. Josephson 
William J. Murphy 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 
Michael S. Pascucelli 
Mary E. Fosdick/Alt 
Robert E. Macklin/Alt 
John R. Verani/Alt 

M GAS INSPECTOR 

Glen Wanzer 

M INSECT PEST CONTROL 
SUPERINTENDENT 

Armand Michaud 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

John Wegzyn 

M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde 

M ALTERNATE PLUMBING 
INSPECTOR 

Rene Rathe 

M SEALER OF WEIGHTS & 
MEASURES 

John R. Harrigan 

M TREE WARDEN 

Armand Michaud 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1980 



1982 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1978 
1978 
1978 

1978 



1978 



WIRING INSPECTOR 

Alfred Tobiasz 



1978 



1978 



Elected 

Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

Appointed by Town Manager 

Other 

Supervised By Town Manager 

Elected At Town Meeting 

Appointed By Moderator 

General Laws 

1976 STM Art II 

Confirmed By Board of Selectmen 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL MAY 2, 1977 

ESSEX, s.s. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 
notify the Inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich qualified to vote in town affairs to 
meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 

MONDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF MAY 1977 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following articles vis: 

Moderator Harold Shively called the meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. with a 
quorum present. The final count showed 672 voters present. 

The Moderator appointed the following as Tellers: Theodore Powers, Mark 
Hayes, Rainer Broekel, Joanne Babson, Leo Marc-Aurele, Robert Todd. 

The Moderator led the pledge of allegiance to the flag, and the Rev. Merle 
Pimentel gave the invocation. The Moderator announced that the Warrant had 
been properly posted. 

It was moved, seconded and duly voted to allow non-voters into the Town 
Meeting. 

Article 1: To fix the salary and compensation of all elected town officers. 

Selectmen Chairman John Pickard moved that the salary and compensation of 
all elected officers be fixed as in the 1977/78 budget. Seconded. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 

A voter asked why so many people had not received copies of the Finance 
Committee's Report, and wished to know where they could be gotten. Mr. 
Pickard replied that they had been delivered by Town employees, he did not know 
why some people did not receive them, and there were none left. 

Article 2: To choose the following officers, vis: 

Moderator for one (1) year 

Two Selectmen for three (3) years 

Constable for one (1) year 

Two (2) members of the School Committee for three (3) years 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places as 
follows: 

Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 
Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 
Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 
Precinct 4 Housing Authority Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue 
On Monday, May 9, 1977. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. 

No action required. 

Article 3: To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee to serve for three 
(3) years. 

Mr. Pickard moved that George Hayes be nominated to the Finance Committee 
to serve for three years. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



Article 4: To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the 
Municipal Budget and raise, appropriate and transfer money for the ensuing year, 
including the compensation of elected town officers, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Committee Chairman Lawrence Pszenny moved that the sum of 
$3,203,425. be raised and appropriated for the purposes hereinafter designated: 

For the Operating Budget $3,203,425.00 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

$ 80,589.26 Sewer Receipts Reserve 
3,232.39 County Dog Refund 
4,031.25 Library Aid Reserve 
300,000.00 Surplus Revenue (Free cash) 
100,000.00 Overlay Surplus to Reserve Fund 
3,270.00 Water Pollution Control 

$491,122.90 

Transfer from Revenue Sharing: 

$ 82,750.00 Sanitation Composite Contract 
130,000.00 Health & Life Insurance 
27,250.00 Workmen's Compensation Insurance 

$240,000.00 

Available Funds and Revenue Sharing 731,122.90 

To be raised and assessed $2,472,302.10 

Seconded. Mr. Pszenny stated that the budget is up 5%, not including salary 
increases for fireman and Town employees. The only fulltime position added was 
that of the Police Department clerk. It was felt that others were either not needed 
or the workload could be rearranged. Mr. Robert Bamford, stating that he was not 
criticizing the Finance Committee as he had spent thirteen years on it, ten as 
chairman, felt that the tax rate will soon be $100. per thousand and with a median 
property valuation of $20,000, the average tax payment will be $2,000. 

Mr. Bamford moved as an amendment to the pending motion: "that wherever 
the figures $3,203,425 appear in the motion now before the House, the same shall 
be stricken out and that there be inserted in place thereof the figures $2,883,083. 
This being a 10% reduction in all departments, divisions, committees, and any 
other body authorized to expend public funds." Seconded. Mr. Pszenny felt there 
was some merit in reviewing the budget and trying to keep it down; however, if 
the amendment passed, it would cause a disruption in many town services. 
Further, there are many items included that the Town has no control over, due to 
unions, state and federal governments. He also pointed out that the total amount 
to be raised and assessed is below Mr. Bamford 1 s figure. 

On a voice vote, the amendment was defeated. Because of a protest, a hand 
count was held; the amendment was defeated 172 to 318. On a voice vote, the 
motion carried. 



OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 









Appro- 




Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


Request 


mended 




1974-75 


1975-76 


1976-77 


1977-78 


1977-78 


1. MODERATOR: 












Salary 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


Expenses 


— 


— 


25 


25 


25 


Total 


100 


100 


125 


125 


125 


2. SELECTMEN: 












Salaries & Wages 


6,963 


9,808 


11,450 


12,260 


11,360 


Expenses 


8,070 


7,876 


1,925 


1,900 


1,900 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


— 


75 


75 


Total 


15,033 


17,684 


13,375 


14,235 


13,335 


3. FINANCE COMMITTEE: 












Salaries & Wages 


148 


121 


100 


150 


150 


Expenses 


1,472 


1,426 


1,675 


1,775 


1,675 


Total 


1,620 


1,547 


1,775 


1,925 


1,825 


4. PLANNING BOARD: 












Salaries & Wages 


518 


450 


700 


2,000 


2,000 


Expenses 


226 


925 


1,025 


2,235 


2,235 


Planning Consultants 












Reimbursable 


— 


— 


10,000 


— 


— 


General 


1,433 


2,148 


— 


4,000 


3,500 


Total 


2,177 


3,523 


11,725 


8,235 


7,735 


5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


9,919 


5,718 


8,400 


5,500 


5,500 


Expenses 


3,342 


3,522 


3,150 


3,800 


3,400 


Capital Outlay 


— 


2,525 


— 


650 


650 


Total 


13,261 


11,765 


11,550 


9,950 


9,550 


6. APPEALS BOARD: 












Salaries & Wages 


440 


390 


400 


400 


400 


Expenses 


312 


360 


392 


350 


325 


Total 


752 


750 


792 


750 


725 


7. TOWN MANAGER: 












Salaries & Wages 


36,614 


39,871 


42,470 


44,1% 


42,971 


Expenses 


14,371 


18,323 


19,350 


11,245 


11,095 


Capital Outlay 


88 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


51,073 


58,194 


61,820 


55,441 


54,066 


8. ACCOUNTANT: 












Salaries & Wages 


30,769 


35,447 


36,253 


37,773 


37,773 


Expenses 


7,857 


6,619 


6,911 


7,625 


7,625 


Capital Outlay 


3,861 


7,993 


9,700 


12,050 


12,050 


Total 


42,487 


50,059 


52,864 


57,448 


57,448 


9. TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 












Salaries & Wages 


33,508 


36,715 


39,236 


40,360 


40,360 


Expenses 


6,043 


5,364 


5,580 


5,475 


5,475 


Capital Outlay 


642 


675 


4,400 


— 


— 


Total 


40,193 


42,754 


49,216 


45,835 


45,835 


10. ASSESSORS: 












Salaries & Wages 


27,632 


30,467 


32,450 


33,093 


33,093 


Expenses 


3,245 


2,880 


3,595 


3,520 


3,155 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


— 


250 


175 


Total 


30,877 


33,347 


36,045 


36,863 


36,423 



11. TOWN CLERK: 



Salaries & Wages 


12,975 


14,112 


14,648 


20,142 


15,993 


Expenses 


1,097 


1,102 


1,530 


1,630 


1,630 


Capital Outlay 


712 


955 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


14,784 


16,169 


16,178 


21,772 


17,623 


12. LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 












Salaries & Wages 


6,889 


7,400 


7,600 


7,980 


7,980 


Other Outside Council 


2,727 


6,909 


— 


— 


— 


Town Council-Litigation 


2,687 


4,253 


4,000 


6,000 


6,000 


Expenses 


140 


93 


1,280 


1,280 


780 


Total 


12,443 


18,655 


12,880 


15,260 


14,760 


13. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION: 












Salaries & Wages 


— 


— 


100 


350 


350 


Expenses 


— 


— 


500 


250 


250 


Total 


— 


— 


600 


600 


600 


14. HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 












Expenses 


160 


652 


200 


725 


725 


15. CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 












Salaries & Wages 


566 


652 


720 


1,200 


840 


Expenses 


716 


607 


1,075 


3,065 


2,875 


Capital Outlay 


3,612 


200 


— 


4,255 


200 


Total 


4,894 


1,459 


1,795 


8,520 


3,915 



16. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION: 

Expenses — — 

17. YOUTH COMMISSION: 

Salaries & Wages 10,450 12,787 

Expenses 9,825 11,017 

Capital Outlay 660 200 

Total 20,935 24,004 

18. BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE: 

Salary 600 600 

Expenses 5,705 7,308 

Total 6,305 7,908 



150 



13,550 
10,620 

24,170 



1,550 
1,550 



150 



13,963 
12,305 

26,268 



150 



13,963 

11,775 

25,738 



19. SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE: 
Salary 408 

Expenses 69 

Total 477 



350 
150 
500 



20. COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



257,571 



288,575 



300 
7,730 
8,030 



305,340 



2,400 
11,283 
13,683 



317,785 



1,200 
7,743 
8,943 



299,521 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



21. POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Chief 

Base 

Incentive 

Holiday 

Total 
Lieutenant 

Base 

Incentive 

Holiday 

Sergeants 
Base 



19,013 

2,822 

793 

22,628 


20,600 

3,059 

931 

24,590 


21,845 
3,277 
1,004 

26,126 


22,938 
3,941 
1,055 

27,934 


22,938 
3,441 
1,055 

27,434 


— 


— 


— 


15,418 


— 


— 


— 


— 


669 
(1)16,087 


— 



(3)34,890 (3)37,665 (4)55,344 (3)43,629 (4)58,172 



Incentive 


2,245 


2,391 


5,004 


6,090 


6,090 


Holiday 


1,471 


1,725 


2,536 


2,007 


2,676 




38,606 


41,781 


62,884 


(3)51,726 


(4)66,938 


Patrolmen 












Base 


(14)144,038 


(15)156,821 


(16)192,009 


(16)200,771 


(16)200,771 


Incentive 


10,424 


15,092 


15,661 


20,882 


20,882 


Holiday 


6,037 


7,157 


8,823 


9,231 


9,231 


Total 


(14)160,499 


(15)179,070 


216,493 


(16)230,884 


(16)230,884 


Patrolmen - New 












Base 


(1)9,491 


(1)10,292 


— 


— 


— 


Holiday 


399 


473 


— 


— 


— 


Total 


9,890 


10,765 


— 


— 


— 


Overtime 


13,206 


13,999 


13,440 


13,500 


13,500 


Shift differential 


2,090 


4,115 


4,992 


6,344 


6,344 


Court Fees 


5,364 


4,931 


6,500 


6,500 


6,500 


Other Salaries 


4,066 


4,292 


4,828 


9,508 


8,018 


Total Salaries 


256,349 


283,543 


335,263 


362,483 


359,618 


Expenses 


12,616 


29,608 


33,530 


45,087 


44,360 


Capital Outlay 


8,802 


13,383 


8,850 


2,100 


2,100 


Total 


277,767 


326,534 


377,643 


409,670 


406,078 


22. DOG OFFICER: 












Salaries & Wages 


1,500 


6,938 


7,500 


9,500 


8,500 


Expenses 


1,248 


3,351 


2,175 


2,760 


2,565 


Capital Outlay 


— 


— 


2,500 


— 


— 


Total 


2,748 


10,289 


12,175 


12,260 


11,065 


23. FIRE DEPARTMENT: 












Salaries & Wages 












Chief 












Base 


17,830 


17,908 


17,830 


17,830 


17,830 


Incentive 


400 


600 


600 


600 


^600 


Holiday 


769 


752 


752 


752 


752 


Total 


18,999 


19,260 


19,182 


19,182 


19,182 


Captains 












Base 


(3)33,015 


(3)33,094 


(3)33,015 


33,015 


33,015 


Salary Differential 


— 


— 


375 


3,000 


3,000 


Holiday 


1,425 


1,392 


1,392 


1,161 


1,161 


Total 


34,440 


34,486 


34,782 


37,176 


37,176 


Firefighters 












Base 


(14)132,619 


(14)127,307 


(14)132,620 


(14)132,753 


(14)132,753 


Incentive 


— 


— 


400 


— 


— 


Holiday 


5,754 


5,279 


5,590 


4,635 


4,635 


Total 


138,373 


132,586 


138,610 


137,388 


137,388 


Overtime 


6,992 


7,290 


7,000 


10,000 


7,000 


Call Lieutenants(5) 


2,100 


2,100 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


Call Operator(l) 


700 


700 


800 


800 


800 


Call Men(26) 


14,275 


13,400 


18,200 


18,200 


18,200 


Total Salaries 


215,879 


209,822 


220,974 


225,146 


222,146 


Expenses 


14,531 


16,207 


17,285 


17,810 


16,910 


Capital Outlay 


3,176 


2,174 


28,025 


3,875 


3,675 


Total 


233,586 


228,203 


266,284 


246,831 


242,731 


24. CIVIL DEFENSE: 












Salaries & Wages 


1,725 


1,800 


2,100 


1,800 


1,800 


Expenses 


929 


1,448 


1,485 


1,305 


1,305 


Capital Outlay 


543 


866 


950 


650 


650 


Total 


3,197 


4,114 


4,535 


3,755 


3,755 


25. SHELLFISH: 












Salaries & Wages 


18,900 


13,830 


14,650 


14,850 


14,725 


Expenses 


2,085 


1,286 


2,550 


2,600 


2,600 


Capital Outlay 


400 


941 


5,425 


600 


600 


Total 


21,385 


16,057 


22,625 


18,050 


17,925 


26. HARBORS; 












Salaries & Wages 


2,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,200 


3,000 


Expenses 


619 


742 


1,605 


1,785 


1,610 


Capital Outlay 


899 


4,755 


4,095 


3,010 


150 


Total 


3,518 


8,497 


8,700 


7,995 


4,760 



10 



27. BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



11,239 10,750 11,200 

908 1,135 1,475 

12,147 11,885 12,675 



554,348 



605,579 



704,637 



11,760 


11,760 


1,575 


1,275 


13,335 


13,035 



711,896 



699,349 



HEALTH & SANITATION 



28. HEALTH AGENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

29. OUTSIDE CONTRACTS: 
Sanitation Composite Contract 
Recycling Collection 

Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Dump Improvement 
Total 



14,502 


15,863 


16,050 


16,410 


16,410 


9,157 


33,638 

75 
49,576 


9,835 


36,805 


36,505 


23,659 


25,885 


53,215 


52,915 


67,000 


92,000 


78,000 


82,750 


82,750 


500 


699 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,300 


1,300 


1,400 


1,400 


1,400 


— 


1,414 


— 


— 


— 


68,800 


95,413 


80,400 


85,150 


85,150 



TOTAL HEALTH 
& SANITATION 



92,459 



144,989 



106,285 



138,365 



138,065 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



30. VETERANS' BENEFITS: 












Expenses 


85,213 


101,138 


136,000 


131,000 


120,000 


Total 


85,213 


101,138 


136,000 


131,000 


120,000 



PUBLIC WORKS 



31. ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

32. TOWN HALL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

33. TOWN HALL ANNEX: 
Expenses 

34. HIGHWAY DIVISION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

35. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Total 

36. SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Rental 
Total 



12,896 
1,270 

14,166 


8,057 
1,658 

9,715 


15,232 
2,160 

17,392 


16,095 

1,800 

805 

18,700 


16,095 

1,600 

550 

18,245 


7,788 

23,333 

426 

31,547 


8,510 

20,677 

29,187 


8,979 
7,100 

16,079 


8,979 
10,200 

19,179 


8,979 
7,700 

16,679 


— 


— 


5,050 


5,550 


5,650 


79,310 

97,691 

23,797 

200,798 


84,916 
134,452 

47,633 
267,001 


95,018 
199,725 

23,500 
318,243 


98,230 
204,975 

94,900 
398,105 


97,030 
190,725 

15,000 
302,755 


18,907 

53,227 
72,134 


11,527 
28,816 
40,343 


12,432 
30,288 
42,720 


12,432 
35,648 
48,080 


12,432 
32,338 
44,770 


11,994 

20,050 

8,667 

40,711 


19,001 
25,424 
22,837 
67,262 


15,000 
27,400 
12,000 
54,400 


15,000 
32,900 
15,000 
62,900 


15,000 
30,900 
12,000 
57,900 



11 



37. FORESTRY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

38. SEWER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



39. RECREATION & PARKS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

40. CEMETERIES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

41. INSURANCE: 
Motor Vehicle 
Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Official Bonds 
Legal Liability 

Total 

42. BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Total 

43. DEBT SERVICE: 
Payment of Interest 
Payment of Principal 
Total 

44. LIBRARY: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



42,426 

12,391 

8,440 

63,257 


46,784 
20,664 
11,089 
78,537 


45,628 
22,105 
19,850 
87,583 


46,300 

25,655 

3,750 

75,705 


45,600 

24,255 

3,750 

73,605 


21,311 
12,832 

34,143 


19,869 
15,380 

35,249 


63,584 
31,400 

94,984 


67,902 
104,625 

15,950 
188,477 


67,902 

96,700 

15,000 

179,602 


456,756 


527,294 


636,451 


816,6% 


699,206 


57,850 

19,492 

7,218 

84,560 


60,545 

21,308 

427 

82,280 


65,539 
19,620 
10,600 
95,759 


66,784 

24,665 

10,600 

102,049 


61,784 
21,400 
10,600 
93,784 


51,104 

7,557 

961 

59,622 


53,265 
10,045 
23,998 
87,308 


57,835 
10,888 
10,000 
78,723 


59,081 

1 1 ,842 

9,300 

80,223 


59,081 

11,739 

9,000 

79,820 


5,985 

24,487 

29,669 

696 

2,007 
62,844 


7,634 

26,388 

29,161 

90 

2,007 
65,280 


9,500 

30,000 

30,000 

900 

2,300 
72,700 


13,713 
20,502 
11,350 
1,500 
4,500 
51,565 


13,713 
20,502 
11,350 
1,500 
4,500 
51,565 


10,787 
165,802 

65,287 
241,876 


10,787 
214,191 

95,705 
320,683 


12,000 
299,684 
114,000 

425,684 


13,200 
295,776 
130,000 
438,976 


13,200 
295,776 
130,000 
438,976 


53,073 
302,000 
355,073 


61,990 
328,000 
389,990 


61,395 

242,000 
303,395 


59,915 
285,000 
344,915 


59,915 
285,000 
344,915 


57,780 

24,298 

1,276 

83,354 


60,606 

27,238 

293 

88,137 


64,515 

35,420 

800 

100,735 


67,412 

39,634 

1,000 

108,046 


67,412 

38,012 

800 

106,224 



UNCLASSIFIED 



45. RESERVE FUND 












(see schedule) 


— 


— 


65,000 


65,000 


100,000 


46. BOND ISSUE COSTS 


2,628 


— 


5,000 


5,000 


5,000 


47. INTEREST ON TAX 












ANTICIPATION 


8,952 


12,189 


20,000 


20,000 


20,000 


48. POSTAGE 


— 


— 


— 


8,075 


7,000 


Total 


11,580 


12,189 


90,000 


98,075 


132,000 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


2,345,256 


2,713,442 


3,055,709 


3,339,591 


3,203,425 



12 



Article 5: To hear and act upon the report of the School Committee relative to the 
School Department Budget and raise, appropriate and transfer money for the 
ensuing year's operations, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee Chairman Walter Pojasek moved that the Town appropriate 
the sum of $4,080,941. for .the School Department budget as here and after 
designated. 

1000 Administration $ 107,605. 

2000 Instruction 2,855,368. 

3000 Other School Services 418,098. 

3500 Athletics 103,119. 

4000 Operation & Maintenance of Plant 485,420. 

5000 Fixed Charges 25,696. 

7000 Acquisition of Fixed Assets 55,385. 

9000 Programs with other Districts 30,250. 

$4,080,941. 
Less Available funds: 

Feoffees Grammar School 7,500. 

Title III Funds 4,437. 



$ 11,937. 



The Total to be raised and assessed is $4,069,004. 

Seconded. Mr. Pojasek stated that though labor negotiations have not been 
concluded, funds have been put in the budget; money is also included for 
reconstruction of the roadway (School Street) around the school, and for the 
replacement of Tiger III. Mr. Pszenny reminded that the student population is 
decreasing but the budget has increased; there have been staff reductions but the 
766 staff has been increased. The voice vote was questioned; on a hand vote, 334 
voted in the affirmative, 151 in the negative. Motion carried. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover 
the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $292,374.48 
to cover the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of 
the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen unanimously in favor, though it feels the amount is very high. Mrs. 
Conley for the Finance Committee stated that her Board recommended the article 
since there isn't an alternative. It hopes that the Town will make its opinion 
known to the Whittier School Committee, regarding the high per pupil cost, 
expensive programs. Paul Gahm suggested that our representative on the Whittier 
School Committee should be elected rather than appointed in the hope that we 
would have more control over the budget. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
make major maintenance repairs, renovations, and alterations to existing public 
schools and to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing 
or otherwise, or take any other action with respect thereto. 

Mr. Pojasek moved that $150,000. be appropriated for remodeling, 
reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the existing schools of the 
Town and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 

13 



Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $150,000. under General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A) as amended. Seconded. This is the second of a 
three-year program in which extraordinary repairs will be made. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommend. Harold Wile questioned the 
replacement of the fire alarm system in the Jr. High School; the architect replied 
that the present system does not conform to the State Building Fire Codes. On a 
two-thirds vote, the motion carried 400-52. 

Article 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
replacement and to make major maintenance repairs and renovations to an 
existing un-named road from the area of the High School to High Street and to 
install a drainage system in the pump-house area of the High School. 

Mrs. Nan George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion 
carried on voice vote. 

Article 9: To see if the Town will vote to accept the existing un-named road from 
the area of the High School to High Street as a Public Way or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Mrs. George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 

Article 10: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue for the financial year beginning July 1, 1977 and ending June 30, 1978 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in 
accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and 
hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue for the financial years beginning July 1, 1977 and ending June 30, 1978 in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 
Seconded. Motion carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

Article 11: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid from revenues by 
the Water Department during the fiscal year 1978, and to see what action the 
Town will take in regard to surplus funds. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town raise and appropriate $272,747. for the 
current expense of the Water Department, the same to be paid from revenues by 
the Water Department during the fiscal year 1978. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum to be made available 
for said purpose from the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that $700. be raised and appropriated to be used in 
conjunction with a matching sum of the Chamber of Commerce of Ipswich for the 
purpose of the promotion of the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 

14 



Article 13: To see what action the Town will take in regard to the transfer of any 
surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town transfer $25,000. from the Surplus Account of 
the Electric Light Department to the General Fund for the purpose of reducing 
taxes. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

Article 14: To see what sum the Town will raise and appropriate to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the sum of $28,924.35 be raised and appropriated to pay 
unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid: 

Town Counsel 

F. Dale Vincent $ 247.00 

Water 
Dames & Moore 10,788.76 

Henry Whynock 60.00 

Dog Officer 

Daniel E. Grant 214.70 

Assessors 
David M. Jewett, M.D. 35.00 

Cemetery 
David M. Jewett, M.D. 10.00 

MBTA 

Mass. Bay Transp. Auth. 12,856.13 

Legal (Police Arbitration) 

Lawrence Holden 197.58 

Bicentennial 
Susan Erickson 164.47 

James S. Price, Inc. 15.40 

Recreation 

Richey & Clapper, Inc. 88.81 

David Jewett, M.D. 15.00 

Ipswich Water Department 99.00 

Vernon's, Inc. 487.84 

Fire 
J. R. Sousa 63.19 

92.45 

34.30 

242.69 

57.50 

Fire 
(1975) Cable Memorial Hospital 793.20 



15 



Forestr> 

Princeton Nurseries 108.00 

Highway 

iwich - Electnc Department 2.000.00 

School 

N.E. Assoc, of Schools & College- 200.00 

Central Scientific Compam 16.50 

Suburban Propane 96.83 



528,924.35 

Seconded 

Mr. Pszenny questioned the payment to Dame- & e. This agreement was 

made by a former Town Manager and payment is to be made on advice of the 
Town Counsel. On a four-fifths hand vote. 423 voted in the affirmati\e. 54 in the 
negative. 

Article 15: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the Fiscal 
19"" Seuer Department account for payment of electricity and heating oil 
expenses, or take any action relative thereto. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that the sum of $21,000. be appropriated to supplement 
the Fiscal Year 19~~ Sewer Department Budget and to meet this appropriation the 
sum of S21 .000. be transferred from Sewer Receipts Reserve. Seconded. The new 
sewer plant is costing more to run than was anticipated. Finance Committee 
:e:ommendec ;n carried on a voice vote. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
construction off roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Mr. Damon moved that the sum of $39,000. be raised and appropriated for the 

construction off roads under Chapter 90 of the General Law s. Seconded. This will 

:r another stretch of Linebrook Road, finishing the surface, painting traffic 

lines, and bordering. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a 

voice vote 

Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the maintenance of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Lav 

Mr. Damon moved that the sum of S4.500. be raised and appropriated for the 
maintenance of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. This will 
be for work to be done on Jeffrey's Neck Road from New march Street to Island 
Park. Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 18: To hear and act upon the reports of committees, and to continue such 
committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Moved by John Conley that the report of the Historic District Study Committee 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by William Crafts that the report of the School Building Needs 
Committee be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous 
voice vote. 



16 



Moved by Irving Small that the Government Study Committee report be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by Alice Keenan that the report of the Mosquito Control Committee be 
accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Moved by George Mathey that the report of the Police Station Study Committee 
be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Article 19: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for an act allowing the Town to renew for one year or any other 
term $114,400 Federal Aid Notes which are payable on November 10, 1977, 
notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1945 as amended, or 
take any other action with respect thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition 
the General Court for an act allowing the Town to renew for one year or any other 
term $114,400. Federal Aid Notes which are payable on November 10, 1977, 
notwithstanding any provision of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1945 as amended, or 
take any other action with respect thereto. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 20: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for all 
necessary engineering, surveying, design and related services for construction of 
a pump storage reservoir between Scott and Bush Hills and Pine Swamp Road, 
river intake and pumping station, transmission pipeline to the reservoir, water 
filtration plant, sludge disposal facilities and transmission pipeline to the water 
filtration plant and to the Town's distribution system together with all necessary 
appurtenances; and to determine whether the same shall be raised and 
appropriated, transferred from available funds, or borrowed under G. L. Chapter 
44, Section 8; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and 
use any money that may become available for that purpose from the Federal 
and/or State Government, or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that $432,000. is appropriated for the Water Department for 
all necessary engineering, surveying, design, and related services for a pump 
storage reservoir between Scott and Bush Hills and Pineswamp Road, river intake 
and pumping station, transmission pipeline to the reservoir, water filtration plant, 
sludge disposal facilities and transmission pipeline to the water filtration plant and 
to the Town's distribution system together with all necessary appurtenances; that 
to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $432,000. under General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 7(22) as amended; and that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to apply 
and contract for Federal and State aid for the purposes of this motion, to acquire 
any necessary easements or other interests in land, and to take all action 
necessary to carry out the purposes of this vote. Seconded. Mr. Pickard and Mrs. 
Robertson gave the background on the proposed reservoir. The Conservation 
Committee reluctantly supported the article, with Mrs. Weatherall stating that 
since 1967 all suggestions have come back to a reservoir. Mr. John Beagan stated 
that the Planning Board unanimously supported the article. Fred Paulitz spoke 
against the article. Jacob Hoffman said that the choice is between a reservoir and 
well, and that two more good wells would supply our needs while a reservoir 
wouldn't be operative for at least five years. Mr. Pimentel remarked that water is 
a problem all over the country; objections to this reservoir would make it easier 
for the State to come in with 30B; no one wishes to take land from citizens and 
under this proposal no homes would be taken; this reservoir should last us into the 

17 



next century. The question was moved and the motion carried. On a two-thirds 
vote on the original motion. 327 voted in the affirmative. 219 in the negative. As 
364 affirmative votes were needed, the motion was defeated. 

Article 21: To see if the Town will vote to establish an Industrial Development 
Financing Authority for industrial development purposes, pursuant to Chapter 
40D of the Massachusetts General Laws, and make the appropriate findings and 
declarations, or take any other action with respect thereto. 

John Josephson moved that the Town Meeting vote to establish an Industrial 
Development Financing Authority for Ipswich. It is hereby declared that an 
Industrial Development Financing Authority is needed in the Town of Ipswich, 
and that unemployment or the threat thereof exists in the Town of Ipswich, and 
that security against future unemployment and lack of business opportunity can 
be provided, by attracting new industry to the Town through an industrial 
de\ elopment project or projects financed under Chapter 40D. as amended, of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. It is hereby determined that there is a need for such 
an authority, and in making this determination, this Town Meeting has taken into 
consideration the Town's ability to adjust to any expected increase in the demand 
for municipal facilities and services as a result of the expected increase in 
employment and business activity from such industrial development. Seconded. 
This motion is required by State law for the establishment of an Industrial 
Development Financing Authority (five person) Board appointed by the 
Selectmen. There is no cost or financial liability to the Town. Board of Selectmen. 
Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 22: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the expenditure of 
anti-recessionary Federal General Revenue Sharing funds for the purposes of 
replacing Town Hall storm windows, providing exterior wall insulation and 
heating system repairs and or replacement in the Town Hall building, and 
renovating certain Town Hall offices, and to pay for professional plans, 
specifications and estimates in this regard, and take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town authorize the expenditure of S26.865. of 
anti-recessionary Federal General Revenue Sharing funds for the purposes of 
replacing Town Hall storm windows, providing exterior wall insulation and 
heating system repairs and or replacement in the Town Hall building and 
renovating certain Town Hall offices, and to pay for professional plans, 
specifications, and estimates in this regard. Seconded. Mrs. Conley stated that the 
Finance Committee supported this article. The Committee had discussed it with 
the Selectmen and concurred with their plan, and hoped that the heating system 
would have first priority. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 23: To see if the Tow n w ill vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and or 
the Town Manager to enter into a contract or contracts with the Massachusetts 
Bay Transportation Authority pursuant to General Laws. Chapter 161 A. Sections 
3 (j) and 5 (j). for the provision of train service to the Town for the periods January 
1 . 1977 through June 30. 1977 and July 1 . 1977 through June 30. 1978. substantially 
in accordance with the contract heretofore in existence between the MBTA and 
the Town, with such changes, additions and deletions as the Town Manager, with 
the advice of Town Counsel and the Ipswich Commuter Rail Transportation 
Advisory Committee, may determine, and that the sum of S50.000 be raised and 
appropriated therefor. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen and or the 
Town Manager to enter into a contract or contracts with the Massachusetts Bay 

18 



Transportation Authority pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 161 A, Sections 3(j) 
and 5(j), for the provisions of train service to the Town for the periods January 1, 
1977 through June 30, 1977 and July 1, 1977 through June 30, 1978, substantially in 
accordance with the contract heretofore in existence between the MBTA and the 
Town, with such changes, additions and deletions as the Town Manager, with the 
advice of Town Counsel and the Ipswich Commuter Rail Transportation Advisory 
Committee, may determine, and that the sum of $15,000. be appropriated from 
available funds in the Treasury (Free Cash) and that the sum of $35,000. be raised 
and appropriated therefor. Seconded. John Vincent gave the background of the 
Town's association with the MBTA. Finance Committee recommended. Motion 
carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Vincent then moved that the MBTA Committee be continued. Seconded. 
Motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 24: To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken under Article 17 
at the annual Town Meeting held June 9, 1975 pertaining to the purchase of land 
on Avery Street, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to rescind action taken under Article 17 
at the Special Town Meeting, June 9, 1975 pertaining to the purchase of a parcel of 
land on Avery Street. Seconded. The owner has sold the property in question to 
another person. Motion carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

Article 25: To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 40, Section 22D, 
regarding the towing away of vehicles illegally parked or standing on Public Ways, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Police Chief Armand Brouillette moved that the Town vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 40, Section 22D of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
as amended, entitled "Towing Away of Vehicles Illegally Parked or Standing on 
Public Ways". Seconded. This will allow the Selectmen the same authority that 
the State Department of Public Works has. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 26: To see if the Town will vote to accept Herrick Drive as a Public Way or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Member William Thoen moved that the Town accept as a public 
way the layout of "Herrick Drive" on a plan entitled "As Built Subdivision Plan 
of Herrick Acres in Ipswich, Mass." dated December 5, 1975 by Philip L. 
Pattison, P.E., recorded with the Essex South District Registry of Deeds in Plan 
Book 137, Plan 23, consisting of two (2) pages. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 27: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of conducting a fair cash revaluation of all properties in the Town: 
to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer 
from available funds or otherwise; or take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Cobb moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $75,000. for 
the cost of conducting an expert Fair Cash Value revaluation of all properties in 
Town. Seconded. This article is intended to put the Town in compliance with the 
State Statutes. Within the past year eighty taxpayers appealed their valuation and 
won. The Finance Committee voted 5-4 against this article, feeling there should be 
a written proposal. Board of Selectmen, Conservation Commission, Planning 

19 



Board all in favor. Thomas Emery for the Finance Committee minority felt that 
the Town is in bad shape and needs revaluation. On a motion to move the 
question, voice vote carried. On the original motion, the vote was 205 in favor, 
230 against — motion defeated. 

Article 28: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer and his 
successors in office to sell with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, at public 
auction any of the property which the Town may have acquired or may hereafter 
acquire through proceedings based upon nonpayment of taxes or under 
proceedings for the sale of lands of low value . to impose upon the property so sold 
such restrictions, reservations or conditions as shall be deemed expedient, and to 
execute and deliver in the name and under the Seal of the Town quitclaim deeds 
or other instruments therefore, or to see what action the Town will take in the 
matter. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, as adopted by the Annual Town Meeting on March 5, 1973 by adding the 
following section at the end of Chapter VI thereof: 

Section 4. Sale of Property for Nonpayment of Taxes 

The Town Treasurer and his successors in office are authorized to sell, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, at public auction any of the property which 
the Town may have acquired or may hereafter acquire through proceedings based 
upon nonpayment of taxes or under proceedings for the sale of lands of low value, 
to impose upon the property so sold such restrictions, reservations or conditions 
as shall be deemed expedient, and to execute and delivery in the name and under 
the Seal of the Town quitclaim deeds or other instruments therefore. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommended. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

» 
Article 29: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Ipswich Industrial 

Development Commission, a Development and Industrial Commission 

established under the provisions of Section 8A. of Chapter 40, of the 

Massachusetts General Laws, to seek any and all sources of State and Federal 

funding for the purpose of acquiring land, construction of roads, utilities, and 

related facilities for the establishment of a proposed Industrial Park in the area of 

Mitchell Road in Ipswich and to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Ipswich 

Industrial Development Commission to enter into negotiations with owners. 

abutters, and other concerned parties for the purchase of necessary land. 

easements, and related rights in land for the establishment of such proposed 

Industrial Park; provided that the Ipswich Industrial Development Commission 

expend no Town funds for such purchases without the authorization and 

appropriation of the Town Meeting, or take any action relative thereto. 

Paul Beswick moved that the Town vote to authorize the Ipswich Industrial 
Development Commission, a Development and Industrial Commission 
established under the provisions of Section 8 A of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, to seek any and all sources of State and Federal funding for the 
purpose of acquiring land, construction of roads, utilities, and related facilities for 
the establishment of a proposed Industrial Park in the area of Mitchell Road in 
Ipswich and to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Ipswich Industrial 
Development Commission to enter into negotiations with owners, abuttors. and 
other concerned parties for the purchase of necessary land, easements, and 
related rights in land for the establishment of such proposed Industrial Park; 
provided that the Ipswich Industrial Development Commission expend no Town 
funds for such purchases without authorization and appropriation of Town 
Meeting. Seconded. Mr. Beswick explained the advantages of industrial parks and 

20 



the meaning of the article. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning 
Board recommended. Conservation Commission unanimously opposed the 
article. Cornelius Cleary suggested an amendment to the motion, which Town 
Counsel ruled was not in good order. A motion to move the question was carried. 
The original motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 30: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
complete the extension of the sanitary sewer down County Road to the 
intersection of County and Essex Road, as previously voted on Article 23 at the 
annual Town Meeting of May 3, 1976 and to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that the sum of $30,000. be raised and appropriated to 
complete the extension of the sanitary sewer down County Road to the 
intersection of County and Essex Roads, as previously voted on Article 23 at the 
Annual Town Meeting of May 3, 1976. Seconded. When bids were opened March 
25, 1977 the low bid was $30,000. more than the sum originally appropriated. This 
sewer line will also service Southern Manor. Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

A motion to adjourn until Tuesday, May 3, 1977 at 7:30 was made, seconded 
and carried on a voice vote. 

The Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 7:45 p.m. on Tuesday, May 3, 1977 
with a quorum present after being postponed for lack of a quorum at 7:30. The 
final count was 455 voters present. 

Article 31: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire easements and/or land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or 
otherwise in certain parcels of land consisting of approximately 20 acres on Essex 
Road, south of, and adjacent to, Heatherside Lane and Lakeman's Lane, for 
location and installation of a new well and to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for said purpose; and to determine whether such sum may be raised by borrowing 
or otherwise; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Damon moved that $60,000. is appropriated for the surveying and 
acquisition by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise of the following 
parcels of land or any necessary easements or lesser interests therein for the 
location and installation of a new well: consisting of approximately 20 acres on 
Essex Road, south of and adjacent to, Heatherside Lane and Lakeman's Lane; 
and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $60,000. under General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 7(3) as amended; and that the Selectmen are authorized to take all action 
necessary for such acquisition and to carry out the purposes of this vote. 
Seconded. The owner of this property is asking $3,000. per acre; any money left 
after the purchase and surveying will be returned to the treasury. The Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. On a two-thirds vote, 294 voted in the 
affirmative, 33 in the negative. Motion carried. 

Article 32: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, in 
addition to a sum of money appropriated at a Special Town Meeting held on 
November 29, 1976, for the design and construction of a well on Essex Road, and 
for the required connections to the Town water system and related services; to 
determine whether such sum shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

21 



Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $120,000. in 
addition to a sum of money appropriated at the Special Town Meeting, November 
29, 1976 for the design and construction of a well on Essex Road, and for the 
required connections to the Town water system and related services and to meet 
this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
authorized to issue $120,000. in bonds or notes under Chapter 44, Section 8(5) of 
the General Laws as amended. Seconded. The money appropriated last year was 
not enough; this is a good well with a low mineral content and produces almost as 
much as Brown's Well. Finance Committee recommended. On a two-thirds vote, 
the motion carried with 306 voting in the affirmative and 26 in the negative. 

Article 33: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, in 
addition to the sum of money appropriated at a Special Town Meeting held on July 
12, 1976, for further engineering design, surveys, and related services, and for the 
opening of sanitary landfills to conform with certain Rules and Regulations of the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Quality Engineering and certain 
requirements as prescribed by the Attorney General; to determine whether such 
sum shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that $95,000. is appropriated in addition to the sum of 
money appropriated at a Special Town Meeting held on July 12, 1976 for further 
engineering design, surveys, and related services and for the opening of sanitary 
landfill areas to conform with certain Rules and Regulations of the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering and certain requirements 
prescribed by the Attorney General and that to raise this appropriation the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow 
$95,000. under Chapter 44, Section 7(24) of the General Laws as amended. 
Seconded. The first area of the dump is now ready to be covered over with loam, 
seeded, and the second area opened. We will probably need another $95,000. next 
year to put the whole area in good shape. Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. On a two-thirds vote, the motion carried with 323 voting in the 
affirmative, 6 in the negative. 

Article 34: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the work required, including design, construction and related services, to 
make Winthrop Well #3 operational and for required connections to the Town 
water system; to determine whether such sum shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $9,000. for 
the work required, including design, construction and related services, to make 
so-called Winthrop Well #3 operational and for required connections to the Town 
Water System. Seconded. Finance Committee recommended, though with 
reservations as the State has ruled we can use the well only in an emergency due 
to the cows grazing on the land around the wellfield. Mr. Gahm spoke against the 
article. The vote was 200 in favor, 126 against. Motion carried. 

Article 35: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of money for 
engineering services for an inflow-infiltration study of the Town's sewer system; 
to determine whether such sum may be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pickard moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 



22 



Article 36: To see if the Town will amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich by voting to 1) revoke in its entirety the "Protective Zoning 
By-Law, Town of Ipswich, 1970", adopted by vote of the Ipswich Town Meeting 
on March 1, 1970, and all amendments thereto to this date and 2) adopt the 
"Protective Zoning By-Law, Town of Ipswich, 1977"; copy of said Protective 
Zoning By-Law and map(s) referred to therein on file at the Town Clerk's Office. 

Planning Board Chairman John Beagan moved to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975 of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and, in 
accordance therewith, to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of 
Ipswich, 1970, as heretofore amended, by deleting said By-law and the zoning 
district maps referred to therein in their entirety, and in complete substitution 
therefor, adopting the Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich, 1977, 
including the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich prepared by Metcalf & Eddy, 
dated March 1977 and the Wetlands District maps prepared by the Autometrics 
Division of the Raytheon Corporation, each entitled "Town of Ipswich Natural 
Resources Map, scale 1" = 600' ", and dated April 9, 1973, all as filed with the 
Town Clerk of Ipswich, but with the following alterations, additions and 
amendments to said By-law and maps: 

a) By adding to the bottom of the column of Accessory Uses in Section V.D. 
appearing on page 15, the words "Fine Arts instructional programs" and 
opposite said words adding the further designations: 

— under the column RR, the symbol and footnote reference "SBA 11 " 
— under the column IR, the symbol and footnote reference "SBA 11 " 
— under the column B, the symbol and footnote reference "pi 1" 
— under the column I, the symbol and footnote reference "pll" 

b) By adding to the bottom of the list of footnotes in Section V.D. appearing on 
page 17, the following as footnote 11: 

1 1 . Provided that all principal and accessory buildings occupy not more than 
fifteen (15) percent of the lot on which said use is located; outdoor 
activities associated with the use are suitably screened by a solid fence 
from adjoining properties, and are effectively controlled so as not to 
provide a nuisance because of noise, traffic, or other conditions which 
may become objectionable to the surrounding neighborhood; and that 
there is no more than one (1) non-resident employee nor more than a 
total of two (2) instructors engaged in the program. 

c) By amending the aforementioned Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich 
prepared by Metcalf & Eddy dated March, 1977, to extend the northwesterly 
boundary of that part of the Business District shown thereon on the 
northeasterly side of High Street (Route 1A) between Mitchell and Paradise 
Roads in a northwesterly direction so that said northwesterly boundary, as 
extended, shall coincide with the northwesterly line of property now of the 
Speliotis Family Trust, said line also being the southeasterly line of property 
now of Mazzola. 

This motion constitutes the report of the Planning Board of the Town of Ipswich 
on the proposed general revision of the Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of 
Ipswich, as required by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. 
Seconded. 

Mr. Beagan explained that this project had begun in 1972 as a result of a study 
made by Nash-Vigier, Inc. at the Town's request; many citizens had been 
volunteer members of the Planning Advisory Committee working on it. However, 

23 



the strongest impetus came from the new zoning act passed by the General Court 
in 1975: it automatically becomes law in June of 1978 and will bring many changes. 
He then went on to explain some of the differences between the present by-law 
and the proposed one. 

The Board of Selectmen recommended 4-1; the Finance Committee 5-4. Mrs. 
Weatherall said that the Conservation Commission had not decided whether or 
not to support the article. The Commission had suggested two-acre lots south of 
the Ipswich River and were unhappy with the extension of the business zone 
down Essex Road. George Mathey, James Theodosopoulos. George Tsoutsouris, 
Kitty Robertson spoke in favor; Cornelius Geary, Edward Nagus spoke in 
opposition. 

Mr. Geary moved for indefinite postponement; seconded. On a voice vote, the 
motion was defeated. On the vote on the original motion, the vote was 284 in the 
affirmative. 103 in the negative. Two-thirds, or 258, was needed; the motion 
therefore passed. 

Article 37: To see whether the Tow n will amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich 1970. as amended to date, by amending the first and second 
paragraphs of Section II. relating to non-conforming uses, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Jason Sokolov moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried 
on a voice vote. 

Article 38: To see w nether the Town will amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich 1970. as amended to date, by amending paragraph A of 
Section VI, relating to lot size and building requirements in the Summer 
Residence District, or take any other action thereto. 

Mr. Sokolov moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

Article 39: To see if the Town will amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich 1970, as amended to date, by adding to Section V.G. the 
following paragraph after paragraph 7: 

8. Municipal and public utilities and services clearly necessary or desirable to 
the support of the neighborhood area, including, but not limited to. fire station, 
pumping station, water storage facilities, or gas or water regulating station. 

Mr. Mathey moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

Article 40: To see if the Tow n w ill vote to appropriate a sum of money to purchase 
land and building currently ow ned by William Rust on Linebrook Road for a Civil 
Defense Headquarters and for future use as a fire sub-station, and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or take any 
other action with respect thereto. 

Mr. Pimentel moved that the sum of S86.0O0. is appropriated to purchase, for a 
Civil Defense Headquarters and for the future use as a fire substation, the land 
and building owned by William Rust on Linebrook Road consisting of 
approximately one-half acre and a building of concrete block construction of 
approximately 500 square feet, more or less, located on Linebrook Road 
approximately 200 feet westerly of the Newburyport Turnpike (Route 1); that the 

24 



Board of Selectmen is authorized to acquire such sewer, water, and access 
easements over other property owned by said William Rust as they deem 
advisable for these purposes; and that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to issue $86,000. in 
bonds or notes under Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws as amended. 
Seconded. Mr. Pimentel explained that this building would be used as Civil 
Defense Headquarters and as storage for three fire trucks now garaged around 
Town, and said that CD. Director John Harrigan and Acting Fire Chief Melvin 
Bowen were in agreement on the use of the building. This purchase had been 
voted once before but came to nought due to zoning problems. Mr. Pimentel 
stated these problems had been taken care of. Finance Committee member John 
Griffin said that his committee did not recommend this article; while they realized 
the need of a fire station in the Outer Linebrook area, they wondered whether a 
building specifically designed as a fire station might not be less expensive and a 
better solution to the problem . . . cited sewerage, setback problems, and said 
Civil Defense would need $1,500. to be able to move in. Under the existing union 
contract, only permanent firefighters can drive fire trucks, therefore Civil Defense 
members would not be able to drive them. 

The Planning Board recommended the article unanimously. Mr. Pickard moved 
the question, seconded, carried. On a two-thirds hand vote, 274 voted in the 
affirmative, 90 in the negative — motion carried. 

Article 41: To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for labor, 
materials, and related services for the remodeling of the Town Hall Annex for a 
Police Station; to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Mathey moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $95,000. for the 
remodeling and reconstruction of the Town Hall Annex for a police station; and 
that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, be authorized to issue bonds or notes under Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A) 
of the General Laws as amended. Seconded. Present facilities are inadequate and 
a new Town Hall is obviously extravagant. Police Station Study Committee 
appointed in July 1976 has been studying the problem and has narrowed the choice 
down to the Annex. They feel there is a good chance of a government grant to 
help. Finance Committee 8-1 in favor. On a two-thirds hand vote, 353 voted in the 
affirmative, 14 in the negative . . . motion carried. 

Article 42: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to file 
applications under Title 33, 1281(g)(1) OF THE United States Code and under 
Chapter 873 of the Acts of 1967 of the General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, for grants to be made to aid in defraying the cost of design of 
sewerage facilities for Jeffrey's Neck, Great Neck and Little Neck, to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to furnish such information and take other such action as 
may be necessary to enable the Town to qualify for and use such grants to agree 
that if such grants are made the Town will pay all of the remaining costs of the 
approved project over and above the amount of the grant, or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to file applications under Title 33, 1281(g)(1) of the United States Code and under 
Chapter 873 of the Acts of 1967 of the General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, for grants to be made to aid in defraying the cost of design of 
sewerage facilities for Jeffrey's Neck, Great Neck and Little Neck, to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to furnish such information and take other such action as 

25 



may be necessary to enable the Town to qualify for and use such grants. 
Seconded. Mrs. Robertson explained that this is a continuation of last year's 
action on the Neck sewerage, the total cost of which is estimated to be around 
$4,000,000. The Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. The 
motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 43: To see if the Town will appropriate and raise $4. 000. 00 for engineering 
services to prepare State and Federal Step Two Grant Applications, and to 
authorize the Town to borrow S408.000.00 in anticipation of State and Federal 
grants, in order to make monthly payments for engineering services and other 
incidental costs, to prepare construction drawings and specifications for the 
construction of sewerage facilities as outlined in the "'initial construction 
program" of the '"Jeffrey's Neck. Great Neck and Little Neck Waste Water 
Facilities Plan": to determine if such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, 
transfer from available funds or otherwise, and to authorize the Town to expend 
any grants, planning advances or reimbursements for previous preliminary- 
planning received by the Town on this project. 

Mrs. Robertson moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000. 
for engineering services to prepare State and Federal Step Two Grant 
Applications, and to authorize the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen to borrow $408,000. in anticipation of State and Federal Grants, in 
order to make monthly payments for engineering services and other incidental 
costs, to prepare construction drawings and specifications for the construction of 
sewerage facilities as outlined in the "initial construction program" of the 
"Jeffrey's Neck. Great Neck and Little Neck Waste Water Facilities Plan". 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended. Finance Committee recommended 
7-2. On a hand vote, 296 voted in the affirmative. 27 in the negative — motion 
carried. 

Article 44: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money to explore and test 
possible water well locations within the Town and for the development of 
additional well fields and wells: to determine whether such appropriations shall be 
raised by borrowing or otherwise: or to take any other action related thereto. 
(Petition i 

Mr. Damon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000. to explore and test possible well locations within the Town. Seconded. 
D. L. Mahar will conduct testing for additional well sites and are hopeful that a 
good producer with low mineral content can be found and will not need treatment. 
Finance Committee recommended. Paul Brailsford was surprised the Town did 
not go for a reservoir, and mentioned many ways of conserving water. The 
question was moved, seconded, and carried. On a voice vote, the original motion 
carried. 

Article 45: Will the Town of Ipswich petition the General Court under Article 
LXXXIX of the Amendments to the Massachusetts Constitution for special 
legislation to exempt the Town of Ipswich from the operation of Section 108L of 
Chapter 41 of the General Laws, pertaining to a career incentive pay program for 
police officers. 

Mr. Pszenny moved for indefinite postponement, stating that there was a bill in 
the General Court on the incentive question and his Committee would wait to see 
what happened to it. Seconded. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 46: To see if the Tow n w ill direct the Board of Selectmen to bring forthw ith 
in the appropriate Court(s) an action at law on behalf of the Town against parties 

26 



and assets proper to represent and account for activities carried out on and with 
respect to that parcel of land located in Ipswich, Massachusetts, which is zoned 
for and commonly known as the Planned Community Development (PCD) for the 
purpose of obtaining (a) an order to cease and desist from further interfering with 
the water and/or flow of water on that parcel of land to which the Town of Ipswich 
holds rights to and (b) money damages as provided by law for having interfered 
with the said water and/or flow of water; or take any other action thereto. 
(Petition) 

Cornelius Cleary moved that the Town vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to 
bring forthwith in the appropriate court(s) an action at law on behalf of the Town 
against parties and assets proper to represent and account for activities carried out 
on and with respect to that parcel of land located in Ipswich, Mass., which is 
zoned for and commonly known as the Planned Community Development (PCD) 
for the purpose of obtaining (a) an order to cease and desist from further 
interfering with the water and/or flow of water on that parcel of land to which the 
Town of Ipswich holds rights to and (b) money damages as provided by law for 
having interfered with the said water and/or flow of water; or take any other action 
thereto. Seconded. Mr. Pickard stated the Board of Selectmen were unanimously 
opposed. Mrs. Conley stated that the Finance Committee was opposed. The 
motion was defeated on a voice vote. 

Article 47: To see if the Town will adopt the following By-Law; Extensions of the 
sanitary sewer system shall require approval by Town Meeting vote, or take any 
other action thereto. (Petition) 

Edward Michon moved that the Town of Ipswich adopt the following By-law; 
Extensions of the sanitary sewer system shall require majority approval by Town 
Meeting vote. Seconded. Mr. Michon felt that the Selectmen had assumed Town 
Meeting rights in granting permission to a private builder to extend the sewer 
system to his property; abuttors were not given opportunity to present their views 
but will be assessed betterment charges. Board of Selectmen opposed the motion 
3-1-1. Finance Committee opposed 7-2. Mrs. Donna Smith asked what chapter of 
the General Laws covers this matter; Town Counsel replied Chapter 83, Section 
21. The question was moved, and on a hand vote, 101 voted in the affirmative, 138 
in the negative — motion defeated. 

Article 48: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money to make Paradise 
Road a dead-end street and to improve and to make certain construction on 
Mitchell Road, to determine whether such appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing or otherwise; or take any other action relative thereto. (Petition) 

Paul Grenier moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $1.00 and direct the 
Town Engineer to conduct a feasibility study to make Paradise Road a dead-end 
street, and to improve and to make certain construction on Mitchell Road. 
Seconded. Mr. Pickard stated that the Selectmen will have Town Engineer James 
Chase look into the matter. The Finance Committee did not recommend because 
no costs were given but agreed that the Selectmen should have the Town Engineer 
look into the matter. The motion carried on voice vote. 

Article 49: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purpose of designing and constructing an extension of the sanitary sewer 
system along Wood's Lane and Grant Court between Old England Road and 
Turkey Shore Road, or any portion thereof, and to determine whether such 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise, or to take any action 
thereto. (Petition) 

Walter Ziemlak moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried 
on a voice vote. 

27 



Article 50: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the necessary 
funds to remove the debris from and generally improve the safety and appearance 
at the site of the former Marguery Restaurant, County Road, Ipswich. (Petition) 

Nathaniel Pulsifer moved to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$10,000. to remove the debris from and generally improve the safety and 
appearance at the site of the former Marguery Restaurant, County Road, Ipswich. 
Seconded. The debris referred to is the result of a 1975 fire; Mr. Pulsifer has had 
three estimates indicating that it would cost about $10,000. to clear the site. Mr. 
Pickard stated that the Selectmen are in favor but would like to have a lien on the 
property and hold $10,000. in escrow. Mr. Pszenny said the Finance Committee 
would like an amendment added to the motion. It was moved that the phrase "if in 
the opinion of counsel, a valid lien can be imposed and enforced against the real 
estate" be added. Seconded. Motion to amend carried on a voice vote. On a voice 
vote, the amended motion carried. 

Article 51: To see if the Town will vote to prohibit the transportation on Town 
roads and storage within the Town of fuel, waste products, or other radioactive 
materials connected with nuclear-powered electric generating plants. (Petition) 

Peter Williamson moved to see if the Town will vote to express its disapproval 
of the transportation on Town roads and storage within the Town of fuel, waste 
products, or other radioactive materials connected with nuclear-powered electric 
generating plants. Seconded. Mr. Pickard stated that three Selectmen 
disapproved, two were opposed. Finance Committee was 7-2 against the article. 
Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 52: To see whether or not the Town will designate that the Ipswich River 
be used for recreational clam digging only, or take any other action with respect 
thereto. (Petition) 

Ernest Brockelbank moved that the portion of the Ipswich River from the Town 
Wharf to the mouth of the River be designated as an area for recreational digging 
only. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, Finance Committee 6-3 against. 
Mr. Nagus said they felt it was illegal and discriminatory; Mr. Brockelbank stated 
the Attorney General's office had told him it was legal; it allows all residents and 
non-residents to dig. Town Counsel Dalton opined that according to Chapter 131 
of the General Laws, the article was legal. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

Article 53: To see if the Town will vote to direct the Selectmen to prescribe and 
put before the Town at the next Town Meeting regulations governing a warning 
system for air-borne radiation and to initiate the Town evacuation procedure. 
(Petition) 

Mr. Williamson moved to see if the Town will vote to direct the Selectmen to 
prescribe and put before the Town at the next Town Meeting regulations 
governing a warning system for airborne radiation and to initiate the Town 
evacuation procedure. Seconded. Board of Selectmen were 3-2 against the article, 
Finance Committee did not recommend. The motion was defeated on a voice 
vote. 

On a motion made, seconded and carried on a voice vote, the Town Meeting 
adjourned at 11:00 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 

28 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

I to r: Edwin H. Damon, Jr.; John M. Pickard; Merle R. Pimentel, Chairman; 
Adele C. Robertson, John A. Pechilis. 

(House of Hinlin photo) 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Merle R. Pimental, Chairman 



During this past year the Board has acquired a new chairman, two new 
members and has appointed a new town manager. 

In- the election of May 1977 Norbert White was elected to the Board. Mr. 
White's term was shortened when he was killed in an auto accident in October 
1977. During his term Norbie led an effective water conservation drive as well as 
being involved in the other concerns of the Board. His death was a significant loss 
to the Board and to the town. 

To replace Mr. White a special election was held in December 1977. John 
Pechilis was elected and has brought to the Board many years of experience in 
town government. 



29 



George Howe was appointed Town Manager and began serving the town on 
August 1. Mr. Howe is an intelligent, hard working manager and in his time here 
thus far is bringing increasing effectiveness to our town government. 

The Board still struggles with the need for an improved water supply and is 
currently pursuing ground water exploration with the hopes of putting one or two 
new wells on line in the near future. 

The tax rate is a continuing concern and the Board is pleased that last year's 
rate increased only by $1.00. 

A key to stabilizing the tax rate is the bringing of stability to the town 
government. The key to stability in the town government is an effective town 
manager who will have the support of the selectmen and the people of the town. 



TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 

This past year has been one of transition and of defining the goals of our Town 
government. Having arrived in Town in August, I have focused my attentions on 
sound budgeting, cash management, planning for our capital improvement needs, 
and labor negotiations. 

In keeping with the philosophy of orderly growth, our Town must make a 
concerted effort to define its needs, but in doing so it should limit its goals to 
obtainable ones, administratively and financially. 

I wish to express my appreciation for the fine welcome the community has 
given me, for the cooperation extended by the members of the Town departments, 
boards, and committees, and for the leadership and policy guidance which the 
Board of Selectmen has provided. 




30 




DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Bottom row I to r: Police Chief Arm and R. Brouillette; Town Clerk Harold G. 

Comesu; Town Manager George E. Howe; Chief Assessor Varnum S. 

Pedrick; Recreation-Parks Director James H. Daly; Youth Director 

Cathleen McGinley. 
Middle row I to r: Shellfish Constable Charles Gianakakis; Harbor Master Peter 

George; Veteran's Agent Frank Story; Acting Fire Chief Melvin Bowen; 

Cemetery Superintendent Walter Hulbert; Town Counsel Charles Dalton. 
Top row I to r: Engineer James E. Chase; Librarian Eleanor Crowley; Public 

Works Director Armand T. Michaud; Electric Light Manager Ralph L. 

Hebert; Dog Officer Melvin Blaquiere. 



(House of Hinlin photo) 



31 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Yarnum S. Pedrick, Chief Assessor 

The total assessed value of real estate and personal property committed to the 
Treasurer for collection uas S~4.728.000. The total is an increase of 
approximately $780,000. over 1976. The modest increase of SI. 00 on our tax rate 
was much less than the majority of Massachusetts" communities and was a 
pleasant surprise to many people w ho had anticipated a much greater rise in taxes. 

We also committed S464.970. in motor vehicle excise taxes which is a slight 
increase over the previous year. 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 



Ralph L. Hebert. Inspector 




1977 


1976 


Sl.817.916 


S3. 231. 164 


2.994 


4.448 


195 


138 


on 755 


925 


S 3.964 


S 5.511 


248 


244 



Construction Valuation 

Fees Collected: 
Building Permits 
Occupancy Permits 
Certificates of Inspection 

Total Fees Collected 

Building Permits Issued 

New construction, miscellaneous construction, additions, remodellings. 
demolition, signs, pools, and siding. 




CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Superintendent 

There were 86 interments in 1977 compared to 92 in 1976, with a 91 average for 
the past five years. 

Three single, seven doubles, two fours & three eight grave lots were sold with 
perpetual care. One four grave and four two grave lots were awarded to Veterans 
by the American Legion, with no revenue for care of these lots. 

Forty monument and marker foundations were laid and ten sets of lot bounds 
were set. Ten Veterans' government markers were set. 

General groundskeeping was conducted in all cemeteries; including raising and 
repairing all winter and settled graves in the older cemeteries. 

The new office and garage had two coats of paint applied and other structures 
were also painted. Painting was done by a CETA employee with cost of paint from 
the cemetery budget. A new shingle job was done to a storage shed in Linebrook 
cemetery. Work was done by one CETA and one Town employee, with material 
out of the cemetery budget. 

The hot topping work in Locust Grove Cemetery, which used 127.5 tons of base 
and finish, was completed. 

The Department purchased two 36" cut power mowers and two 21" push type 
mowers. 

All equipment was- kept properly serviced. Water lines on the grounds were 
repaired. Some of the damage was caused by old pipe decay and some vandalism. 
Monuments were restored due to damage by vandalism. 

All Cemetery records were Microfilmed to date to protect us in case of loss. 

Monies collected for FY 1977 are as follows: 

Interment openings $4,245.00 

Three dis-interments & Re-inter. 163.74 

Chapel Tent Rentals 360.00 

Converted from annual to Perpetual 1,200.00 deposits 

New lots & Graves perpetual care 1,920.00 deposits 

New lots & Graves purchased 1,610.00 sale of lot fund 

Annual care income 315.00 

(Perpetual Care & Flower Fund Income $9,813.74 
not known as of this report.) 



33 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

John R. Harrigan, Director 
Robert O'Meara, Assistant Director 

As Civil Defense Director for the Town of Ipswich, it is my responsibility to see 
that this agency is in a state of readiness to handle a wide variety of civil 
emergencies. Civil Defense is ready, thanks to the members of each of our support 
groups who put in many long hours. Organizing and training Civil Defense 
Support Groups are Auxiliary Police. Auxiliary Fire, Citizen Band Search and 
Rescue, and Races Communications Group. 

During 1977 repairs were made to four fallout shelters and a central storage area 
for equipment was built. .All Civil Defense equipment was inspected and repaired 
as needed. 

Training for preparation of an emergency is never ending: our support groups 
are constantly in some form of an educational program. Added to their 
requirments this year, we are pursuing Basic Meteorology and Radiological 
Monitoring. 

Goals for 1978 Are as Follows: 

1 — Upgrade our emergency warning system. 

2 — Upgrade our emergency network communications equipment. 

3 — Continue our emergency First Aid Training 

A — Evaluate our needs to standby in a greater state of readiness. 
5 — A maintenence program will be set up to care for our equipment. 



COLLECTION-TREASURY DIVISION 

George C. Mourikas, Treasurer-Collector 

The following bills were committed from the Assessors for collection: Real 
Estate. Personal Property. Farm Animal Excise, and Motor Vehicle Excise. 

A schedule of receipts were rendered to the Town Accountant monthly. 

A record of Trust Fund transactions were maintained. 

All disbursements, both Town and School, were processed through this office, 
and all receipts were deposited and faithfully recorded. 

We are getting ready to streamline the collections and all other functions in the 
Treasurer and Collector's Office with direct line terminal to a computer bank. 

Within the next year or so the project should be in full operation. 



34 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Alexander Sweenie, Chairman 

Work on an Open Space and Recreation Plan continued throughout 1977 with a 
completion date set for April 1978 so that the plan can be studied by the Town and 
adopted at the May Town Meeting. Many hours of work have been contributed by 
interested citizens in researching and writing the report and producing an 
accompanying map. The finished product will show and describe lands of 
conservation interest and means by which orderly growth can occur while 
preserving and enhancing Ipswich's character. 

The Town received a check from the state's Self-Help Funds as a 
reimbursement for the Marini Conservation land purchase. The Commission is 
considering in the near future other purchases of land of watershed and/or 
recreational value. 

A River Walk from the canoe landing on Peatfield Street to Willowdale Road 
was sponsored by the Commission in May to celebrate Ipswich River Days. 

The Commission worked with other town boards to study and evaluate current 
issues such as the sewer lines to the neck area, water removal and growth of 
vegetation at Hood's Pond, hunting on commission-administered property, the 
208 Water Quality Program and the Coastal Zone Management draft plans. We 
met with the Industrial Development Commission to keep informed in the early 
planning stages of their industrial park plans in the Mitchell Road area because of 
our interest in protecting the wetland in the area of the Brown's well aquifer. 

The Commission has been concerned with the ownership of marsh land. Some 
of this land is listed as "owner unknown" with the assessor. This land can be 
claimed by the Town because taxes have not been paid on it, but the legal steps to 
have the deeds so declare this are expensive. The Commission will work toward 
deed clarification of the Town's ownership and ConCom control of the salt marsh 
lands because it feels the marshes need as firm protection in their natural state as 
can be had. 

Much time and effort was spent again in 1977 educating the public on their 
responsibilities under the Wetlands Protection Act and seeking compliance with 
the law. Five wetland hearings were held. 

Mr. Alexander Sweenie was appointed early in the year to be the seventh 
member of the Commission, and was chairman by year's end. David Knowlton 
and Jack Johnstone were appointed as new members when Dr. Robert Goodale 
retired after many years of good service and Ray Hodgdon did not seek 
reappointment. The Commission has been fortunate to have the services of a 
consulting member, Lu Johnson, who has contributed to both the planning efforts 
and the regular duties of the Commission. 



35 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Virginia Poulen, Chairman 

This year is really the first year the Council on Aging has been effective. 
Previously, we had very limited funding and were without central headquarters; 
although for a short period last year we had an office upstairs in the Town Hall 
which proved to be very ineffective due to the stairways which were too steep for 
the elderly to manage. 

However, this year we have obtained an office and drop-in center which has 
proven most effective. Presently, the drop-in center is staffed by two ladies who 
were furnished to us by the Senior Community Service Employment Program. 
Both of these ladies work five hours per day and are paid by the aforementioned 
program. Consequently, the office and drop-in center is open ten hours daily 
Monday through Friday. 

As a result of the above, we have been quite a source of help to the elderly of 
this town. We have conducted a survey from door to door with a questionnaire for 
the elderly which informed us of the most important needs of the 1500 or 1600 
elderly in this town. After analyzing the results of this survey, we should be able 
to conduct a program which should be beneficial to them. 

We also display the craft handiwork of quite a number of the elderly, the sale of 
which helps them a great deal. Of course, the primary object of this organization is 
to help the aged to become self-sufficient so that they will not become 
institutionalized. If we are successful in our endeavors, we should save the town a 
considerable amount of money. 

The Council on Aging offers a free blood pressure clinic on every Tuesday 
between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon at the Drop In Center. 



DOG OFFICER 

Mel Blaquiere 

During the past year, there were: 
35 dogs reported lost 
30 dogs found 

84 dogs confined at the Pound 
68 dogs returned to owners 
16 dogs destroyed 
7 dogs killed by motor vehicles 
53 dog bites (total for 1977) 
450 complaints received and answered 

The leash law still has a little way to go before it is at 100%, but with the help of 
the dog owners of Ipswich I think it will work very soon. This report is only for the 
5Vi months I have had the position of Dog Officer. 

36 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 



Alfred L. Tobiasz, Manager 



OFFICE — 222 High Street, Hours 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. Tel. 356-4331, 4332. 
Emergency calls night, Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays call Power Plant 
356-3600. 

The acceptance of Chapter 775 of the Acts of 1975 at the 1976 Annual Town 
Meeting permitted the Town to enter into an agreement with the Massachusetts 
Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC) to supply the town with 
wholesale power requirements until 1989. 

As the result of this alliance, the Electric Advisory Board studied the power 
supply program and recommended to the Electric Commissioners to enter into an 
agreement to purchase power from seven power plants, scheduled to be built, in 
the amount of 11876 kilowatts of which 9591 KW will be supplied by Automic 
Plants. 

In 1978 the Department will study and recommend the most economical method 
to firm up the capacity and relation of the existing sub-transmission lines running 
from the NEPCO sub-station in Groveland, MA to the Ipswich Power Plant. 

MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROPOSED 1978 

1 . Install a new underground distribution circuit off County Rd. to provide power 
to the 94 housing units presently under construction by the Ipswich Housing 
Authority. 

2. Complete the installation of 25 KV spacer cable on Mitchell Road and Avery 
Street. 

3. Install 5100 KVAR of capacitors to improve our overall distribution system. 

CONSTRUCTION COMPLETED IN 1977 

1. A new three phase power circuit was installed to supply power to Winthrop 
Wells No. 2 & 3. 

2. New insulated conductors were installed on Fellows, North Ridge and off 
Linebrook Road. 

3. A new 24000 volt transfer switch was installed in sub-station #4, High Street. 

4. 7- streetlighting fixtures, 22 overhead services and 6 underground services, 19 
poles, 5995 feet of overhead wire and 820 feet of underground cables and 462 
KVA of transformers were added to the system. 

MAINTENANCE 

42 overhead and 3 underground services, 22 poles and 20 streetlighting fixtures 
were replaced. Maintenance at the Generating Plant was carried out by the Power 
Plant personnel and all units are in good operating condition. 

37 



STATISTICS 

Aver. KWH used by KW Peak Meters in 

Year Residential Customers Demand Service 

1957 2458 4,400 3,465 

1962 2994 6,445 3,733 

1967 3819 8,600 4,078 

1972 6006 12,050 4,524 

1977 6003 13,600 4,783 

POWER GENERATED & PURCHASED 

1976 1977 

Generated 8,476,860 1,122,050 

Purchased 53,802,874 65,061,922 

Total KWH 62,279,734 66,183,972 
This represents an increase of 6.29% in power usage as compared to 1976. 



ESSEX COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

Robert W. Spencer, Superintendent 

Summary of work accomplished in Ipswich in 1977. 

Prehatch or winter ice-dusting: 18 acres treated 

Spring Larviciding: 26 acres treated. 

Upland Ditching with power equipment: A total of 1085 feet of ditching was 
accomplished as follows: off High Street — 560.feet, and Plains Rd. — 100 feet. 

Dredging of Saltonstall Brook adjacent to V.F.W. Hall — 200 feet and 225 feet 
off Town Farm Road. **The work on Saltonstall Brook in December was 
curtailed because of cold weather, but will be continued in the spring. 

Salt marsh ditching with power equipment: A total of 11,325 feet of the salt 
marsh ditching installed in the 1930s under Chapter 112 of the Acts of 1931 was 
recut off Town Farm Road in the area bounded by the town dump, the Boston and 
Maine Railroad Bed and the Rowley River. 

The project spray truck: Assigned to Ipswich was at work in the town on 
twenty-six days: May 27; June 3, 9, 17, 21, 24, 28; July 1, 5, 8, 15, 19, 21, 26, 29; 
August 2, 5, 9, 12, 16, 19, 23, 26; September 2, 6, 9. 

Catch basin treatment: On July 1, 5, and 21, a total of 508 catch basins were 
treated with the insect growth regulator Altosid to prevent emergence of adult 
mosquitoes. 

38 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Melvin A. Bowen, Acting Chief 

There were only two major fires during the year. Both fires came during the 
month of December, and the men did a super job to keep these fires from 
spreading to other property. All our new men attended classes at the Training 
Academy in Topsfield during the year. One man, George Hulbert, retired this 
year. The present personnel complement consists of: 

Permanent force 
3 Captains 
14 Privates 

Call Force 

3 Lieutenants 
25 Firefighters 

Fire Loss Report 

Assessed value of property having fire 1,238,106 

Fire Insurance carried 2,145,105 

Fire insurance paid 235,175 




GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving G. Small, Chairman 

During the year ending December 3 1 , 1977, the Government Study Committee has 
received no communication or instruction from the Board of Selectmen 
concerning any matters which they might wish to have investigated. Accordingly, 
the Committee has held no formal meetings during the year. 

39 



GROWTH POLICY COMMITTEE 

George Mathey, Chairman 

As reported last year at this time, the Growth Policy Committee submitted 
Ipswich's Statement of Growth Problems and Priorities to the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council on schedule in July of 1976 as mandated by the Massachusetts 
Growth Policy Development Act, Chapter 807 of the Acts of 1975; and the 
M.A.P.C. completed and edited each of its constituent local Statements and 
submitted its own regional report to the Office of State Planning. The O.S.P., in 
turn, issued an interim report in January 1977 and a final report in September of 
the same year, almost a full year behind schedule. 

The Ipswich Committee was pleased and gratified to see that the vast majority 
of Local and Regional Committees share its beliefs as expressed by many citizens 
at two hearings, that growth must be slowed down and managed, that community 
character must be preserved, that the State must help in providing opportunities 
for local employment, that the property tax is inequitable, that the quality of our 
natural environment must not be compromised and that our farm land must be 
preserved. The O.S.P. report concludes by making recommendations too 
numerous to mention here which would help to ensure that these concerns are 
addressed. However, with the exception of legislation, initiated by Fred 
Winthrop, which allows owners of farm land to sell development rights to their 
property thereby substantially relieving them of the pressures to sell their land to 
developers, implementation is, so far, lacking. 

Copies of the Ipswich, Regional and the State Growth Policy Reports are 
available in the Library. 



HARBOR DEPARTMENT 

Peter S. George, Harbormaster 

The year 1977 was a very busy year for the Harbor Department. Although 
tragedy struck in other towns, Ipswich had only two minor incidents. One was a 
collision of two boats and the other was a boat that caught fire and exploded. 
There were no injuries reported in either incident. 

All areas, including the upper river and Hood's Pond, were patrolled by the 
Harbor Department. 

On several occasions I was called out by the Police Department for night chase. 
The violators were arrested after high-speed chases and prosecuted in court by the 
Police. 

As in past years, the Registry of Marine Recreational Vehicles assisted me. 
Numerous citations were issued by us and the violators were prosecuted. 

40 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



TCWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1977 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 



ASSETS 




LIABILITIES & RESERVES 




CASH 




TEMPORARY LOANS 




General 


254,367.64 


Anticipation Fed-Aided P.W.Proj. 


688,300.00 


Revenue Sharing 


46,005.62 






Public Works Employment 


Fund 43,721.00 


AGENCY 




Petty 




Group Insurance Deduction 


30,316.64 


Accounting 


5.00 


Tax-Sheltered Annuities 


7,063.59 


Schools 


260.00 


Excess Sale-Land of Low Value 


717.32 


Electric 


275.00 


Insurance Receipts 


6,854.00 


Library 


60.00 




44,951.55 




344,694.26 


GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 




CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT 




Bid & Performance Deposit 




Revenue 


1,687,229.19 


Historical 


500.00 


Revenue Sharing 


225,000.00 


Meadowbrook 


2,737.74 




1,912,229.19 


Electric Meter 


7,460.00 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 




Electric Meter Income 


8.728.58 


Taxes 






19,426.32 


Personal Property 




TAILINGS 




Levy 1967 


56.25 


Unclaimed Checks 


7,816.77 


Levy 1969 


48.00 






Levy 1970 


278.60 


TRUST & INVESTMENT FUNDS 




Levy 1971 


310.80 


Cemetery Perpetual Care Bequests 


1,040.00 


Levy 1972 


358.40 


Conservation Fund 


33,489.39 


Levy 1973/4 


2,352.63 




34,529.39 


Levy 1974/5 


3,279.50 


FEDERAL GRANTS 




Levy 1975/6 


9,060.17 


Schools 




Levy 1976/7 


33,807.93 


Title I 


1,664.23 


Real Estate 




Title II 


8.28 


Levy 1972 


66.08 


Title III 


2,640.49 


Levy 1973/4 


1,326.47 


Title IV 


27,000.00 


Levy 1874/5 


8,074.16 


Title IV 


3,907.40 


Levy 1975/6 


64,990.30 


Title VIB 


705.65 


Levy 1976/7 


247,646.39 


Library 






371,655.68 


Title I 


81.14 


Excise 




General 




Motor Vehicle 




Revenue Sharing 


6,005.62 


Levy 1964 


1,560.38 


Anti-Recession 


16,856.00 


Levy 1965 


2,801.31 


Industrial Development 


18.250.00 


Levy 1966 


290.41 




77,118.81 


Levy 1967 


1,333.02 


STATE GRANTS 




Levy 1968 


382 . 49 


Mass. Shellfish Propagation 


13,417.60 


Levy 1969 


171.94 


Elderly Affairs 


500.00 


Levy 1970 


1,089.72 




13,917.60 


Levy 1971 


1,237.88 


OTHER GRANTS 




Levy 1972 


6,775.87 


Heritage Trust 


2,051.82 


Levy 1973 


16,120.07 






Levy 1974 


26,243.72 


APPROPRIATION BALANCE 




Levy 1975 


39,795.16 


General 1976/7 


715,767.07 


Levy 1976 


72,174.19 


1977/8 


7,762,865.83 


Levy 1977 


125,430.16 


Revenue Sharing 


25,000.00 




295,406.32 


Library Building 


4,532.85 






Anti-Recession-Twn.Hall Renov. 


26.865.00 
8,535,030.75 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 



ASSETS 






LIABILITIES & RESERVES 




Farm Animals 






UTILITY BALANCES 




Levy 1973 




20.00 


Electric 




Levy 1974 




20.00 


Maintenance & Operation 


(16,310.02) 


Levy 1975 




32.50 


Depreciation 


160,592.13 


Levy 1976 




203.50 
276.00 


Construction 


1,105.61 
145,387.72 


Special 






Water 




In Litigation 






Maintenance & Operation (approp) 


272,747.00 


Levy 1970 




287.66 


Plant & Investment (approp) 


16,090.92 


Levy 1971 




287.25 


Construction 




Levy 1972 




286.84 


Dow's 


516.69 


Levy 1973 




215.10 


1969 


430.71 


Levy 1974 




201.29 


1970 


5,556.39 


Levy 1975 




618.34 


1971 


1,395.55 


Levy 1976 




730.59 


1973 


29,713.34 


Levy 1977 




752.78 


1976 


426.66 




3 


,379.85 




326,877.26 


Tax Titles & Possessions 






LOANS AUTHORIZED & UNISSUED 


1,674,400.00 


Tax Titles 


47 


,813.47 


OVERESTIMATES 1977 




Tax Possessions 


7 


,809.28 


Mosquito Control 


2,458.00 




55 


,627.75 


Special Education 


14,604.00 


Special Assessments 






Met. Air Pollution Control 


33.16 


Added to Taxes 






Ipswich River Watershed 


11.91 


Levy 1973 




23.40 


State Recreation Areas 


2,308.36 


Levy 1975 




23.40 




19,415.43 


Levy 1976 




225.90 


OVERLAY SURPLUS 


50,338.23 


Levy 1977 




443.17 


OVERLAY 




Apportioned Paid in Advance 




(93.08) 


Levy 1967 


56.25 


Committed Interest 






Levy 1969 


48.00 


Levy 1973 




23.87 


Levy 1970 


278.60 


Levy 1975 




7.89 


Levy 1971 


310.80 


Levy 1976 




306.55 


Levy 1972 


421.12 


Levy 1977 




211.73 


Levy 1973/4 


3,998.89 




1 


,172.83 


Levy 1975/6 


24,361.71 


Departmental 






Levy 1976/7 


35,807.23 


Engineering 




45.00 




65,232.60 


Health 




172.14 


REVENUE RESERVED UNTIL COLLECTED 




Veterans 


57 


,512.16 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


295,406.32 


Highway Machinery 




690.62 


Farm Animal Excise 


276.00 


Cemetery 




200.50 


Special Assessment 


1,172.83 


Education 




523.00 


Special Taxes 


3,379.85 




59 


,143.42 


Tax Title & Possession 


55,627.75 


Municipal Electric 






Departmental 


59,143.42 


Rates and Charges 


374 


,247.13 


Electric 


374,247.13 


Municipal Water 






Water 


60,178.67 


Rates and Charges 


54 


,901.98 


Sewer 

Aid to Highways 


24,701.66 

49,685.58 

923,819.21 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 



ASSETS 




LIABILITIES & RESERVES 
RESERVE FOR PETTY CASH ADVANCE 




Liens Added to Taxes 


600.00 


Levy 1971 


162.63 


SURPLUS REVENUE 




Levy 1972 


215.97 


General 


519,791.11 


Levy 1973 


86.55 


Municipal Electric 


32,866.30 


Levy 1975 


191.20 


Water 


44,315.70 


Levy 1976 


1,005.00 


Sewer 


11.931.30 


Levy 1977 


3.615.34 




608,904.41 




60,178.67 


RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION 




Sewer 




Sale of Cemetery Lots 


13,284.95 


Rates and Charges 


24,073.63 


County Dog Refund 


2,157.59 


Liens Added to Taxes 




Environmental Protection 


2.400.00 


Levy 1971 


23.52 




17,842.54 


Levy 1972 


20.35 


REVOLVING 




Levy 1973 


19.29 


Cafeteria 


3,176.73 


Levy 1976 


82.19 


Athletics 


5,222.87 


Levy 1977 


482 . 68 


Historical 


1.295.77 




24,701.66 




9,695.37 


Aid to Highways 








State 


31,005.58 






County 


18,680.00 
49,685.58 






Fed-Aided P. W. Project 


688,300.00 






REVENUE 1977/8 7 


,267,552.93 






LOANS AUTHORIZED 








Sewer 3/7/66 


343,000.00 






Water 3/5/73 


160,000.00 






Sewer 3/3/75 


54,400.00 






Water 5/3/76 


28,000.00 






Wellfield 11/29/76 


75,000.00 






School Repairs 5/2/77 


150,000.00 






Well Site Acquisition 5/2/77 


60,000.00 






Well Construction 5/2/77 


120,000.00 






Sanitary Landfill 5/2/77 


95,000.00 






Building Purchase 5/2/77 


86,000.00 






Annex Renovation 5/2/77 


95,000.00 






Neck Sewer 5/2/77 


408,000.00 






1 


,674,400.00 






COURT JUDGMENT 








Country Gas Service, Inc. 


121.24 






OVERDRAWN OR UNPROVTDED-FOR ACCOUNI 






Library Building Trust 


3,800.57 






Library Trust Fund 


134.31 






Historical Entitlement 


253.22 






Police Revolving 


220.00 






Snow & Ice Control 


51,906.93 






Uniform Deduction 


182.46 
56,497.99 







TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



UNDERESTIMATES 1977 






County Tax 


25, 


,365.62 


Veterans' District 


1. 


.553.00 




26, 


,918.62 


OVERLAY 






1966 




3.30 


1974/5 




13.36 



16.66 



13.266.905.78 



13.266.205.78 



Source: Town Accountant 



TCWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 

DEBT ACCOUNTS 



NET FUNDED OR FIXED DEBT 
Inside 
Outside 
Public Service 



1,065,000.00 
220,000.00 
506,000.00 



SERIAL LOANS 
Inside Debt Limit 
General 
School Repairs 
Sewer 

Sanitary Landfill 
Outside Debt Limit 
General 
Sewer Construction 
Public Service 
Electric 
Water 



1,791,000.00 



150,000.00 

820,000.00 

95,000.00 



220,000.00 

266,000.00 

240,000.00 

1,791,000.00 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
NOT DUE 137,587.02 



APPORTIONED SEWER REVENUE DUE 



SUSPENDED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
NOT DUE 



4,430.i 



142,017.90 



1977 


13,526.04 


1978 


13,223.68 


1979 


12,236.29 


1980 


11,359.39 


1981 


10,807.60 


1982 


10,588.58 


1983 


9,077.34 


1984 


7,711.23 


1985 


7,212.84 


1986 


7,212.84 


1987 


6,739.12 


1988 


6,523.23 


1989 


5,906.38 


1990 


4,553.33 


1991 


4,354.97 


1992 


3,737.69 


1993 


2,457.60 


1994 


321.79 


1995 


37.08 


SUSPENDED SEWER REVENUE 


4,430.88 



142,017.90 



Source: Town Accountant 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1977 



DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 
General Appropriation 
Revenue Sharing Appropriation 



FEDERAL GRANTS 
Title I 
Title II 
Title III 
Title VIB 
Title VII 



STATE GRANTS 

Library Extension 
Shellfish Propagation 
Bicentrnnial (Historical) 



OTHER GRANTS 

Heritage Trust 



PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISE 
Electric 

Operation and Maintenance 
Building Construction 
Construction 
Depreciation Fund 



7,861,067.33 
254.576.18 



8,115,643.51 



2,580.15 

1,505.87 

2,920.16 

28,645.91 

23,591.47 



7,689.46 

1,798.16 

627.73 



33.00 



Water 



Operation and Maintenance (Approp.) 
Construction (Bond Proceeds) 
Plant & Investment (Approp.) 



2,368,640.37 

5,213.06 

807.00 

71,022.54 



179,268.11 
41,301.10 
70,836.48 



59,243.56 



10,115.35 



33.00 



2,737.088.66 



INTEREST 

On Maturing Debt 
General 
Electric 
Water 
Tax Anticipation 



48,795.00 

14,862.00 

6,905.00 

2.726.07 



73,288.07 



(2) 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Federal Grant 
Serial Loans 
General 
Electric 
Water 



218,000.00 
31,000.00 
50.000.00 



299,000.00 



STATE AND COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 



State Parkd and Reservations 


41,207.27 




Mass Bay Transportation Authority 


54,168.16 




Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 


1,585.05 




Metro Air Pollution Control 


780.75 




Metro Area Planning Council 


1,665.40 




Shellfish Purification Plants 


3,005.15 




Ipswich River Watershed 


1,313.79 




Mosquito Control 


21,887.00 




Audit of Municipal Accounts 


12,679.53 




County Tax 


266.762.39 








405,054.49 


AGENCY 






Dog Licenses for County 


3,812.95 




Veterans District 


16,264.00 




Bid & Performance Deposit 






Meadowbrook 


949.00 




Heartbeak 


7,000.00 




Group Insurance 


147,539.08 




Uniform Deductions 


1,644.87 




Tax Sheltered Annuities Deductions 


28,580.83 




Workmen) s CompensationAdvance 


465.00 








206,255.73 


TRUSTS 






Perpetual Care Bequest 


2,460.00 




Income 


1,646.50 




Flower Fund Bequest 


1,150.00 




Income 


519.65 




Conservation Fund 


500.00 




Other Funds 






Incomes 






John C. Kimball 


38.75 




MRS. Wm. G. Brown 


100.75 




Marriannat Jones 


226.66 




Richard T. Crane 


2,509.16 




Eunice C. Cowles 


692.93 




Mark NEWman 


910.43 




Martha Savory 


103.80 




Dow Boulder 


28.81 




Appleton Memorial 


161.61 




Library Trust Funds 


5,209.69 




Library Building 


2,728.31 




Reimbursement Expense 






R. T. Crane Picnic 


1,306.00 




Eunice C. Cowles 


1.400.00 








21,693.05 



(3) 



INVESTMENT 

Certificate of Deposit 
Revenue 
Non Revenue 
Federal Revenue Sharing 
Stabilization (Income) 



6,502,172.97 

460,000.00 

1,150,000.00 

18.005.44 



8,130,178.41 



REVOLVING 

Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Police 
Historical 



REFUNDS 
Taxes 

Licenses and Permits 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
General Departments 
Health & Sanitation 
Teacher Retirement 
Public Service 
Electricity 
Water 

Meter Deposit 
Meter Deposit Income 
Health 'Insurance 
Accrued Interest 
Other 



186,561.69 

8,208.22 

18,638.50 

333.94 



31,819.65 

165.00 

8,043.99 

181.67 
363.12 

356.70 

750.45 

14,860.00 

993.79 

23.21 
41.80 



213,742.35 



57,599.38 



Total Payments 



20,328,935.56 



Source: TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



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= , = _:• ::.:--::'. z .\: 

BALANCE ON HAN» JANUARY !<, 1T77 : $12,ofio.«lo 

:■, ::-: r =:~ r _'»:: r := •:-= : = " -: r :-_:.: : 

Interest-Ipswich Savings Bank = H7.3fc 

Interest-Ipswich Savings Bank CCaldwell Fund> E~c== 

Interest-Ipswich Cooperative Bank £'=.: = 

Interest-Ipswich Cooperative Bank-Ter« Deposit IbO-Oo 

":-. = : :-::-= flMg.'n 

balance is nam . _iRY 1-. n?s as FOLLoys: 



:=s-i=- :=.i- = s =a-< $ <?fa7.7»i 

Irsuic- :=.i-=s Eank CCaldwell Fund} S^T^-bO 
srative Bank-Paid Up Certificate 
-a-:.; E = -« -"" = -- I =-: si . 






Respectfully submitted -■ 
BURLEY EDUCATION FUW 

V. Janes BiFazio-i Treasurer 



TRUSTEES OF MANNING SCHOOL FUND 

GEORGE H.W. HAYES, DONALD F. WHISTON AND DAVID C. WILLIAMS, SR. 

MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 

January 1, 1977 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $ 50,769.53 

Balance in Account # 7884 i Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 

Balance in Account % 1995, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 21,603.17 

% 97,563.00 

Income from Interest and dividends 6,41 3.05 
$103! §76. 05 

Less Disbursements: 



Rental of Safe Deposit Box % 8.00 

Supplies for Ipswich High School 334.42 342.42 

$103,633.63 
ASSETS IN FUNDS 
December 31, 1977 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank % 50,769.53 
Balance in Account # 7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 
Balance in Account # 1995, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 27,673.80 

$103,633.63 
SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 
276 Shares, First National Bank of Boston $2,998.20 
20 Shares, Ipswich Co-operative Bank 4,000.00 

6,998.20 
$110,631.83 

David C. Williams, Treasurer 



19 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Jerome Richardson, Chairman 
Alexander B. C. Mulholland, Jr. 



Donald F. Whiston, Treasurer 
George W. Hayes 



Financial Statement 1977 



Cash Balance January 1, 1977 
Cash Recieved 1977 

Expenditures 1977 
Cash Balance December 31, 1977 



$ 3,940.32 

130,367.44 

134,307.76 

134,055.42 

252.34 



Little Neck (land only) valued at 

Store Building 

Barn 

Wharf 

Cash in First National Bank- Ipswich 

On Deposit- Ipswich Savings Bank 

Interest 
On Deposit-Ipswich Savings Bank 
Farm Account 

Interest 
On Deposit- Ipswich Savings Bank 
Special Account 

Interest 
On Deposit- Ipswich Co-op. Bank 

Interest and Dividends 

234 Shs 1st Nat'l Boston Corp. 2 
140 Shs Shawmut Ass'n Corp. 2, 
Ipswich Co-op Paid up Cert. 2 



Cost 
74~BT18 
748.63 
000.00 



17,255.88 
1,072.71 

6,406.48 
228.24 

3,767.69 

337.67 

8,136.02 

559.36 

Value 

5,850.00 

3,990.00 

2,000.00 



$ 97,500.00 

4,600.00 

1,090.00 

1,019.00 

252.34 

18,328.59 



6,634.72 

4,105.36 
8,695.38 



11,840.00 
$154,065.39 



$7,500.00 was donated to the town for support of schools, 
The following taxes were paid to the Town of Ipswich: 
Assessed Value 



Land 

Store 

Barn 

Wharf 

Cottages 



97,500.00 

4,600.00 

1,090.00 

1,019.00 

1, 126,590.00 

1,230,799.00 



$ 6,873.75 

324.30 

76.85 

71.84 

78,682.34 

$86,029.08 



Respectfully submitted, 

Donald F. Whiston 
Treasurer 



20 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Jerome Richardson, Chairman Donald F. Whiston, Treasurer 

Alexander B. C. Mulholland, Jr. George W. Hayes 



Exhibit A 

Cash Balance January 1, 1977 $ 3,940.32 

Cash Reciepts, Schedule I 130,367.44 

134,307.76 
Cash Expenditures, Schedule II 134,055.42 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1977 $ 252.34 



OUTSTANDING ACCOUNTS 

1972 $ 559.05 

1973 983.15 

1974 965.38 

1975 1,059.68 

1976 3,768.33 

1977 11,118.73 
$18,454.32 



21 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Jerome Richardson, Chairman Donald F. Whiston, Treasurer 

Alexander B. C. Mulholland, Jr. George W. Hayes 



Schedule I 

Cash Reciepts 

January 1, 1977 to December 31, 1977 

Collections: 

Rent and Land Charges $26,145.40 

Taxes 72,027.90 

Interest 116.77 



Dividneds: 

First National Boston Corp. 439.92 

Shawmut Association, Inc. 224.00 

Miscellaneous : 

Transfers 31,000.00 

Other 413.45 



$98,290.07 



663.92 



31,413.45 
$130,367.44 



22 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Jerome Richardson, Chairman Donald F. Whiston, Treasurer 

Alexander B.C. Mulholland, Jr. George W. Hayes 



Schedule II 

Expenditures 

January 1, 1977 to December 31, 1977 

Taxes : 

Town of Ipswich $86,029.08 

Internal Revenue Service 140.40 $86,169.48 

Donation: 



Town of Ipswich School Department 7,500.00 

Repairs and Maintenance : 

Roads 1,313.26 

Trees and Brush 1,685.50 

Walls 92.12 

Community Center 66.31 

Playground 202.38 3,359.57 

Police : 

Town of Ipswich 1,742.00 

Telephone 176.10 1,918.10 

Salaries and Expenses : 

Salaries 3,383.84 

Transportation 800.00 

Meetings 160.53 

Rental Safe Deposit Box 13.00 

Office Supplies and Postage 109.7 4,467.07 

Insurance and Bond: 574.00 



Miscellaneous : 67.20 

Deposited in Savings Account : 30, 000.00 

$134,055.42 



23 



24 



Mooring violators continue to be prosecuted by me. 

The Shellfish and Harbor Departments, with 100% cooperation, work together 
as one team, which is a definite advantage due to the shortage of manpower on 
both sides. 

On several occasions the Harbor Department was called out for Search and 
Rescue Missions. These missions also included the Police, Fire and Shellfish 
Departments, Coast Guard, helicopters and citizen volunteers. Chic Campaisi, 
Ken Nokes and Police Officer Ed Rauscher assisted numerous times in their high 
speed boats. 

With the cooperation of the Public Works and Electric Light Departments, the 
floats were put in the water and hauled out again for winter storage and for repairs 
for the next season. This included a heavy duty thirty-two foot ramp and another 
new eight by twenty foot float, which was of benefit to boaters while embarking 
and disembarking their passengers. 

Problems which we will face in the near future are as follows: 

1 . Excise tax on boats. I support this tax only to have the money put toward the 
Harbor budget to support a fulltime Harbormaster, increase night patrols, 
purchase S.A.R. equipment and to set aside money each year to go toward a 
dredging program. 

2. A marker to be placed on the breakwater (which we have been working on). 

3. Mariners 

4. Riverdredging 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Chairman 

During 1977, the Historical Commission has been occupied in administering the 
two proposals approved under the first Community Development Block Grant. 
Frank Houde has carried out the functions of Director on a part-time basis from 
the Commission's office in the Town Hall. 

One of the projects, at a cost of $30,000, had as its objective the street 
improvements for the historical upper North Main Street. This work was 
generally completed in the late fall except for some additional planting to be done 
in the spring. 

41 




Historical Upper North Main Street Improvements Project. 

The second project was funded by $70,000 for the rehabilitation and 
preservation of homes in the central downtown area through the use of grants and 
low-interest loans to persons of low and moderate income. The work has extended 
to the year's end, and in retrospect, the Commission believes that the project has 
been an effective instrument in improving some of the most needy housing in the 
Town. For instance, as of the end of the year, 27 persons or family units have been 
assisted with basic repairs and maintenance. Eight of the homes involved have 
been of historic significance while many of the others have been integral parts of 
historic neighborhoods. 

In late August, the Commission was notified that the Town's application for a 
second Community Development Block Grant had been approved. This also 
consisted of two parts: one a grant for $100,000 to carry on the work in housing 
preservation and rehabilitation, the other a grant of $85,000 for preservation work 
in the South Parish House which was used as a Drop-In Youth Center by the 
Youth Commission. Unfortunately, before the project could begin, this historic 
landmark was destroyed in December by fire — a devastating loss to the Town. 
As a result of the fire, the Commission is seeking approval for the transfer of the 
funds for the rehabilitation of the old Heard House, now a Town property, as a 
Senior Citizens' Center. 

The Commission has continued to perform its regular duties of providing and 
maintaining plaques for historic homes and filling orders for its publication, 
"Something to Preserve." 



42 




Seated: Jane Bokron, Ex. Dir. IHA, Sec. William G. Flynn, Dept. of Community 
Affairs, Stanley Eustace, IHA Board Member, Joseph McD. Mitchell, Ips. 
Town Mgr. 

Standing: James Carter, Board Member, Robert Pyne, DCA Arthur Goodfellow , 
Bd. Members, Robert Batemen, DCA. 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

(Miss) Jane Bokron, Executive Director 
Mr. John Thatcher, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority currently administers (3) Projects, (200-1 
Veteran's Housing), (100 Elderly at Caroline Avenue) and (20 Southern Manor) 
and (71 Rent Subsidy, scattered Housing). 

NEW CONSTRUCTION: There are 80 Low Income Elderly and 14 Low 
Income Family units under construction. Ground Breaking was held March 3, 
1977. Contract with Department of Community Affairs was signed February 25, 
1977. To date there is no definite date for completion. 

PROJECT 200-1 VETERAN'S HOUSING: These 23 . . 2-3-4 Bedroom units 
were built in 1950. Each has a gas stove, gas furnace, fire extinguisher. The 



43 



average rent for these apartments is $81.00 per month. 18 of the 24 units have been 
completely painted with scmbbable semi-gloss paint. Spirex window balances 
were installed for easy opening and closing. <"*) new gas stoves have been 
installed. Formica has been installed behind kitchen stove and around the tub 
area. New combination doors and (5) solid wood doors were replaced. Gas 
furnaces and fire extinguishers are inspected annually. 

PROJECTS 667-C2-SOUTHERN MANOR (Elderly): These 20 units were built 
in 1957 and are heated by gas. Each unit has a gas stove and refrigerator. Average 
shelter rent is (70.00 per month. All utilities are paid by the Authority. Average 
age is "9 years young. 11 of the 20 units were completely painted in scmbbable 
semi-doss paint. New kitchen stove hoods were installed. Walks (front and back) 
were hot topped. Annual FREE FLU SHOTS and FREE MONTHLY Blood 
Pressure clinic is available at the Authority Recreation Hall. 

CAROLINE AVENUE (Elderly): These 100 units were built in 1968 and are 
electrically heated. 33 of the 100 units were completely painted in scmbbable 
semi-gloss paint. 14 Hallways (upstairs and downstairs) were completely painted 
in scmbbable semi-gloss paint. Average shelter rent is S73.00 per month. Asbestos 
was installed behind stoves, new clothes lines and ramps were installed for easy 
access for wheelchairs and ambulance. Exterior painting of trim and window 
shutters (36 completed) has started with a completion date set for 1978. Annual 
inspections for hall heaters, bathroom exhausts, fire extinguishers. Average age is 
77 years young. 

RENT SUBSIDY — PROJECT 707: Rent Subsidy provides subsidies for low 
income families, including elderly and disabled persons. It allows the Authority to 
rent privately owned apartments and pay a rent supplement to make up the 
difference in the agreed total monthly rent. This program has helped landlords and 
tenants improve conditions in their apartments. DCA has allocated S94.162 to be 
paid to landlords. Average Rent Subsidies tenants paid to landlords was S78.00 
per month. Average rent Subsidies the Authority paid to landlords was S109.00 
per month for 1.2.3. and 4 bedroom apartments. 

HOT LUNCH: This highly successful congregate dining program was started 
February 25.19"5 and has been increased to "5 daily for many elderly persons in 
this Commonwealth. Meals on Wheels Hot Lunches are delivered from this site. 

MINI-BUS: A 13 passenger Mini-Bus was delivered to the Authority on 
October 5. 19"". Mini-Bus is used to transport elderly tenants to local shopping 
areas and to the Hot Lunch Program. 

CETA PROGRAM: The Authority has 3 CETA employees who have helped the 
Authority in painting the many units. We are most grateful for this sen ice. 

There were two deaths in the elderly projects. To their families, we extend our 
most sincere sympathy. 



44 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 



Paul R. Beswick, Chairman 

1977 was a year where progress continued for Industrial Development in the 
Town of Ipswich. 

Throughout the year, the Industrial Development Commission continually 
reviewed and discussed new industrial activities to Ipswich, as well as matters 
related to existing concerns. 

At the town meeting in May, two articles were passed that further paved the 
way for developing tax revenue from industrial sources in a way that would have a 
major impact toward reducing or stabilizing the Ipswich tax base. One article 
empowered the selectmen to establish an Industrial Development Finance 
Authority. Another article authorized the Industrial Development Commission to 
continue work on arrangements for the establishment of an Industrial Park. 

The Industrial Park site is located on the North side of High Street and on the 
West side of the B&M Railroad track and is accessible by way of Mitchell Road. 
In 1976 this site was studied with funds granted by FMHA through the office of 
OEDC in Gloucester. The study has shown this site to be feasible. During 1977, 
the Town of Ipswich, via the agency of the Industrial Development Commission, 
has applied for additional funds in order to further pursue the establishment of this 
Industrial Park. It is expected that by the end of 1978 this plan can be implemented 
and the first steps, begun. 

This commission continues to see its role as attracting and developing 
non-polluting, light industry in order to support the tax base and create jobs while 
at the same time maintaining the character, historical significance and tradition of 
the Town. 

Close co-ordination with the Ipswich Bay Economic Development Company, a 
private nonprofit group of local citizens that qualify as an LDC (Local 
Development Corp.), has continued. It is most likely that this LDC will furnish the 
financial backing necessary for park development. The IDFA is expected to assist 
prospects with specific financing objectives. 

1977 was also a good year for participation of each member of the committee 
and the roster of nine members has been filled. 



45 



LANDFILL 

James Chase, Engineer 

As you are perhaps aware, the State has ordered the closing of our Town Farm 
Road Landfill. State-approved "close-out" plans have been prepared and it is 
estimated that we have less than one year of refuse operation at that site. 

Municipally-owned landfills, economically inexpensive but environmentally 
unattractive, are a thing of the past. This is due to the public demand for a clean 
environment and legislative enforcement of that demand. In place of landfills, will 
be more expensive regional refuse systems which will turn trucked-in refuse into 
usable energy. The problem locally is that none of the regional systems has in fact 
been built. All are in the planning stages, vying for our rubbish, purporting to be 
the most economical, and are years away from actual operation. 

Possible expansion of our present site was investigated and found not to be 
feasible. Further investigations are being made into other sites in Town and into 
privately-owned land-fills. Also, evaluations of each of the proposed regional 
systems are being made. Whatever the outcome, rubbish disposal is going to be 
more expensive than in previous years. 

Rubbish and garbage will NOT be picked up on the following holidays: 

New Year's Day January 1 

Memorial Day Last Monday in May 

Independence Day July 4 

Labor Day First Monday in September 

Thanksgiving Last Thursday in November 

Christmas December 25 

During the holiday week, rubbish and garbage will be picked up the day after 
the normal pick-up day. 



PLANNING BOARD 

John T. Beagan, Chairman 

With valuable help of many citizens and other Town Boards, the Planning 
Board presented a comprehensive revision of the Ipswich Zoning By-Law to the 
1977 Annual Town Meeting. This new Zoning By-Law was the result of 28 public 
work sessions, 2 public information forums and a public hearing. The long hours 
of work were successful when the Zoning By-Law was approved at the Annual 
Town Meeting, and consequently when it was accepted by the Attorney General 
of Massachusetts. The Town of Ipswich has been operating under the new Zoning 
By-Law since August 1977. 

The Planning Board also continued to perform its' routine functions such as 
reviewing numerous plans submitted to it for "Planning Board Approval Not 
Required", answering inquiries concerning zoning questions and problems, and 
studying several subdivision plans. The Board approved a subdivision plan for 
Frank Equi off Edge Street in the Pinefield area for 19 lots. 

In order to protect the interests of the Town, the Board has requested 

46 



consulting funds for 1978-1979 to revise the "Rules and Regulations Governing 
the Subdivision of Land" adopted December 03, 1963. This is the major document 
used by the Board in judging and controlling subdivisions. 

During the past year three of our members left the Board. John Prosser had 
served on the Board faithfully for over 10 years. Jason Sokolov resigned after 7 
years of exceptionally dedicated service. George Hayes left the Board to accept 
an appointment to the Finance Committee. Bill Thoen, Roger Burke and John 
Draper were appointed to fill the vacancies by the Town Manager. At the Planning 
Board meeting of March 15, 1977, Jack Beagan and George Mathey were elected 
Chairman and Vice-Chairman respectively. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department answered 10,466 service connected complaints and 
investigated 538 traffic accidents in which 105 persons were injured and one 
fatality. 

The Department served 604 summonses for courts and executed 147 arrest 
warrants. The patrol force issued 1,236 parking tickets and 349 traffic citations. 
There were 761 criminal cases prosecuted in District Court. 

The Department is staffed by twenty-one officers and one civilian. We operate 
four police vehicles, three of which are marked and one Inspector's car. We also 
have radio contact and dispatch the Dog Officer who operates a van. 

Headquarters remains the same as my last report and is not conducive to good 
police work. The Building Committee is still active and it is the hope of the 
Department that the new quarters will be made available very soon. 

We have experienced one of our better years as far as the crime rate is 
concerned. There has been a reduction in crime for the first time in many years. 
We attribute this in part to the increasing willingness of the community to become 
involved in reporting suspicious incidents, and to participate in prosecutions, and 
a more effective Detective Office which occasionally was manned by two instead 
of one officer, and an ever vigilant patrol force. 

I believe that the Detective Office should be increased to two full time men and 
will so recommend to the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

It is my hope to broaden the scope of duties of the Safety Officer and his role in 
the schools on bicycle and pedestrian safety, and to institute in the near future a 
crime prevention program for the Town. 

We were successful in reducing the speed limits on many more of our streets 
this year and our goal within the next several years is to have all streets within the 
community with legally posted speed limits. 

Our motto is: "We stand ready and willing to serve and protect." 

47 



POLICE STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

George Mathey, Chairman 

As a result of the work of this Committee, the Annual Town Meeting of 2 May 
1977, under Article 41, appropriated $95,000 "for the remodeling and 
reconstruction of the Town Hall Annex for a police station." 

During the discussion of Article 41, it was pointed out that the police station 
could not move to the Annex until the town departments and functions presently 
housed there could move to the Town Hall, either in areas of the first floor 
vacated by the First District Court which would move to the second floor or to the 
presently unused areas of the second floor. Funds for either of these options were 
not available. Furthermore, it has been determined that the first option is not 
economically viable since, under state laws concerning the handicapped, an 
elevator would have to be installed. 

At the time of this writing (February 1978), funds for remodeling the second 
floor of the Town Hall for office space appear to be available. Therefore, the 
Committee and the Town Manager will shortly interview some of the many 
architectural firms which have indicated an interest in the project so that one may 
be selected to do the work. 

If all goes well, our Police Department will, by this time next year, be located in 
quarters which are finally in keeping with its excellent performance. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

During a visit to your Public Library in 1977, you may have noticed the new 
carpeting and fresh paint in the Rogers Room — a warm and inviting reading room 
in which to pick up a daily paper, browse, or just get away from a ringing 
telephone. 



Did you know that . . . 

— There are now 58,301 books in your Library, 3,399 of which were added 
during 1977. You will find up-to-the minute fiction titles, along with new 
books on matters of concern to you: money management, home repair 
and personal development, to name but a few. 

— Over 50 pre-school children enjoyed weekly story hours and films in the 
Children's Library; that your youngster's reading needs and help with 
school assignments may all be met by carefully selected titles in the 
bright, cheerful Children's Room. 

48 



More than half the population of Ipswich uses its Public Library; that 
583 new library cards were issued to borrowers in 1977. 

Library staff answered 23,102 questions from patrons in 1977 — 
questions that ranged from methods of getting rid of silverfish in the 
home, to identifying the laws pertaining to midwifery in Massachusetts. 




There is a new public typewriter for use in the Library, along with 
circulating cassette tape players, a new microfilm reader/printer, 
extensive filmstrip and self-study tape cassettes in the area of job 
hunting and vocational guidance — all made possible through a Federal 
Grant under the Library Services and Construction Act, and 
administered by the Board of. Library Commissioners. 

Our Regional affiliation means you can borrow books for yourself, and 
films for your club or organization, from other Public Libraries. 

Your Library circulated 100,222 books, records and magazines during 
1977; that 39,486 people visited the Library during the same period. 

The Friends of the Library sponsored a puppet show, feature movie and 

49 



Christmas Tree Decorating party for the children, along with programs 
of information and entertainment for the adult public. 

— During 1977 the Board of Library Trustees continued to explore means 
of funding a sorely needed addition to the building, but were again 
thwarted in their quest for Federal funding when Ipswich was again 
passed over for funding under the 1976 Public Works Construction Act. 

Take advantage of your community's single recreational, educational and 
informational resource and visit the Public Library. See what there is there for 
you. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Armand J. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department is a conglomerate of the following divisions: 
Public Works Administration; Highway; Forestry; Equipment Maintenance; 
Town Hall/ Annex and Municipal Garage Building Maintenance; Snow and Ice 
Control. Each division is charged with particular responsibilities relating to it's 
duties. When additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, 
personnel are interchanged within the divisions. 

Provided below is a summation of projects undertaken by the individual 
divisions of the Public Works Department. 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Norman Stone, Foreman 

Street sweeping was done twice a week from April to December. 

Approximately 400 tons of cold patch were purchased for repairs to the streets. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces and traffic lines were painted in the business area. 

Traffic and street signs were installed, replaced and repaired around town. 

Curbing was installed on 300' of So. Main Street. 

A total of 1040 catch basins were cleaned by private contract. 

88,540' of center traffic lines were painted on Argilla Rd., Central St., County 
St., East St., High St. , Linebrook Rd., Market St., Mill Rd., No. Gate Rd., No. 
Main St., So. Main St., Topsfield Rd. and the Town Hall parking lot off Elm St., 
by private contract. 

50 



A bituminous wearing surface was applied on the following roadways: Brown 
Sq., Liberty St., Linebrook Rd., Little Neck Rd., Randall Rd. (400'), Sunset Dr., 
Town Farm Rd., Washington St. (2,000'). 

As part of a continuing maintenance project, the followng roadways had surface 
treatment consisting of oil, stone and sand mixture: Candlewood Rd., Chebacco 
Rd., Fellow's Rd., Linebrook Rd. (Chap. 90), Plover Hill Rd., and Sagamore Rd. 

In addition to 25 catch basins being rebuilt, 12 new catch basins were installed 
on: Bayview Rd. (4), Clark Rd., Hodgkins Dr., Linebrook Rd. (2), Little Neck 
Rd., No. Ridge Rd., and Topsfield Rd. (2). 

Shoulders were graded on: Fellow's Rd., Gravelly Brook Rd., Jeffrey's Neck 
Rd., Linebrook Rd., Old Right Rd., and Town Farm Rd. 

Drainage problems were corrected on Capeview Rd. and No. Ridge Rd. 

Sidewalks were installed on Liberty St., Market St. and No. Main St. 

New guard rails were installed on Labor-In-Vain Rd., Linebrook Rd., Plains 
Rd. and Sagamore Rd. 

Federal funds were made available to the Town under Highway Safety Act of 
1973 for 109 regulatory and warning signs with 106 posts. 

Anderson/Nichols Co., Inc. of Boston evaluated and rated six (6) bridges; 
namely, County St. bridge, Green St. bridge, Fox Creek Bridge (Argilla Rd.), 
Gould's Creek Bridge (Labor-In- Vain Rd.), Mill Rd. bridge and Willowdale 
bridge. Four ouf of six of these bridges were found to be in good condition. Both 
Fox Creek Bridge and Gould's Creek Bridge were reported to be in a state of 
advanced deterioration. 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

Charles Foley, Foreman 

The eradication of the Dutch Elm Disease has once again been of prime concern 
to the Forestry Division. 150 Dutch Elm or beetle infested trees were removed 
during the year. 

Injection treatments of Lignasan BLP were administered to 35 Elm trees to kill 
fungus. This process has worked successfully for the past three years. 

All areas of town underwent a 13 week period of mosquito spraying. Trucks 
were sent out four times each week in an effort to combat the heavy brooks of 
mosquitoes. 

Arbor Day ceremonies took place on April 29th during which 500 Douglas Fir 
Trees were distributed to each first grader to take home, plant and care for. 

The Forestry Division also planted 90 trees, including Red Oaks, Scarlet Oaks, 
Beach and Pear trees. 

Approximately four miles of roadsides were sprayed with Krenite, a chemical 
to kill brush. 



51 



The practice of line clearing for the Electric Light Dept. was continued. 

Other work consisted of trimming and pruning trees, removing hanging limbs, 
cutting brush, mowing roadsides, setting up voting booths for elections and setting 
up for the annual Town Meeting. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

John McParland, Mechanic 

All Public Works' vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Municipal Garage. 
At present, there are 30 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good 
operating condition to insure it's availability when needed. Statistical records 
showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle are maintained at the 
Public Works Administration office. 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

A new boiler burner unit was purchased for the Town Hall and installed in 
December. 

All wiring and radiators in the second floor old auditorium in the Town Hall 
were removed. 

Electric wiring in both Town Hall and Annex buildings was repaired and in 
some cases replaced. 

Routine maintenance continued throughout the year. 



SNOW & ICE DIVISION 

The Public Works divisions combined their efforts during the winter months. 
Work consisted of plowing roads, hauling snow . sanding and salting roadways, 
filling sand barrels, clearing catch basins and hydrants and answering 
miscellaneous complaints. Personnel who assisted the Public Works crews during 
the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery. Electric. Parks. Sewer and 
Water Depts. Also utilized were the services of 19 private contractors. 



TEMPORARY HELP 

There have been 15 men from the Comprehensive Employment Training Act 
Program (CETA) working in our divisions. Five of these men are working on a 
wilderness project set up to clear brush and improve several parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Ipswich for the purpose of recreation, conservation and forest 
management. So far they have cleared 20 acres of brush in the Spring St. area. 



52 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

RECREATION — Budget cuts caused some major changes in the Rec. program. 
Directly affected were the tennis instruction program, winter-time basketball and 
the Pony baseball program. The tennis instruction program that was offered free 
of charge to children and a small fee for adults was shifted to a pay-as-you-go set 
for both youngsters and adults. Where 400 had taken advantage of the program the 
previous year, the attendance fell off 50 percent to 200 attendees. 

Funds for the winter basketball program (instructors & supervisors) were 
eliminated. Saturday programs for elementary and Junior High students at the 
Junior High gym were carried on by volunteers. Attendance figures remained 
stable at 100 or better depending on weather and travel conditions. Basketball for 
men, two nights a week at the high school gym, was also continued with volunteer 
supervisors. An average of 20-40 took advantage of the program. 

Budget limitations also brought about a major change in the Pony type baseball 
program designed for boys in the 13-16 age bracket. Where two teams had been 
carried in the past, only one was sponsored last summer and entered in the Pony 
Division of the Inter-Town league. With 40 boys signing up for the program many 
problems developed in the manpower, transportation, equipment and other areas. 
It is the hope of the Dept. to return to the two teams this coming summer. 

During the fall and winter months the Dept. made arrangements for ballroom 
dance instructions and a slimnastics program for women. Both were self 
supporting and carried out in the Memorial bldg. mornings and evenings. 

PLAYGROUNDS — Nine playgrounds were staffed and the usual summer 
time programs carried out over an eight week period. Offered were athletics, arts 
& crafts and a variety of special programs including visitations here of 
semi-professional entertainment. Several field trips were enjoyed to Crane's 
Beach, Gloucester, Canobie Lake, Benson's Animal Farm and other areas. 
Attendance at all playgrounds was normal, that is, an average daily attendance at 
the smaller playgrounds of 20-30 youngsters and 40-60 at the larger playgrounds 
where more facilities were available. Special programs and day trips attracted an 
average of 200 youngsters. 

Slightly over 550 took advantage of the swim instruction program that was held 
daily at the Don Bosco pool. In charge was supervisor Ruth Norwood who was 
assisted by 4 Red Cross qualified instructors. The program was highly successful 
with thanks to Don Bosco officials. Once again the school dept. bus was made 
available at no cost. The chauffeur was David Welsh. 

The Director and playground staff assisted in carrying out the annual July 4th 
parade and field day jointly sponsored by the Town and the V.F.W. The same 
personnel assisted in promoting the annual marathon in conjuction with Olde 
Ipswich Week. 

The Director arranged 5 day trips for Ipswich senior citizens. Arthur 
Goodfellow of the Golden Age Club, Percie Chevrie of the Caroline Ave. Social 
Club and Harold Bowen of the Council on Aging all took part in planning the type 
and destinations of the outings. All favored short trips and more of them. 

As in the past the Dept. cooperated with and assisted where and when possible 

53 



with Little League, Girls Elementary softball, men's softball leagues, the Chiefs' 
Town team and other interests. Space in the Memorial Building was readily made 
available to all organized groups for meetings. 

PARK DEPARTMENT — The crew has been kept busy maintaining an 
estimated 65 acres of parklands including 9 playgrounds, 13 ball fields, 4 tennis 
courts and a myriad of smaller areas under their jurisdiction. The winter months 
are spent making minor repairs and re -decorating the Memorial bldg. Much time is 
spent on constructing new boardwalks for the beach use and repairing & painting 
playground equipment. 

Members of the Rec-Park committee are Chairman John R. Morrow, Charles 
Foley, Thomas Flynn, Frederick Garand and Betty Geanakakis. Park crew 
consists of Norman Chambers, Roland Kelley and George Bouranis. Part-time 
Secretary is Barbara Robishaw. 




54 




IPSWICH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Seated left to right: 

Paul K. Gahm 

Deanna Cross 

M. Patricia Manning, Chm. 

Richard A. Nylen 



Term Expires 
1978 
1980 
1980 
1978 



Rear left to right: 

Thomas L. Moscarillo, D.D.S. 

Walter J. Pojasek 

Susan Kollins, Student Advisor 

Ernest F. Brockelbank 



1979 
1979 
1978 
1978 






55 




Superintendent of Schools 

John H. Stella. Superintendent 

With decreasing state reimbursements for local education, small towns like 
Ipswich face serious financial challenges in the years ahead. While it is our 
responsibility to provide quality education for our youth, the taxpayers who 
support local education are already burdened and need relief. Alternative methods 
to finance education should be explored. Efforts by local and municipal officials 
should be directed, toward our legislative representatives to insure that the 
Massachusetts General Court fully funds Chapter "0 State Aid to Education and 
Chapter ^66. which is the program to meet the special needs of our students. 

In my opinion, the Massachusetts Legislature should not introduce or mandate 
local programs for education without fully funding them. All of us involved should 
expend our effort to have this message communicated to our legislators. 

Enrollments — Our total school enrollment on October 3. 1977. was 2209. a 
decrease of 117 students as compared to 2326 on October 1. 1976. This is a 
substantial drop in enrollment and it reflects itself in the K-6 levels. On October 1 . 
1976. there were 1231 students enrolled in K-6 and on October 1. 1977. 1106 
students were registered in K-6. a decrease of 125. 

The breakdow n of Ipsw ich students registered at Whittier as of October 1 . 1977 
follows: 



56 



Grade 9 29 

Grade 10 -.37 

Grade 11 28 

Grade 12 28 

Post Secondary 

Post Graduate 3 



Total 125 

The above figure of 125 represents a decrease of eleven (11) over 1976. 

Decreasing Enrollments — A major factor in decreasing enrollments has been 
the steadily decreasing birthrate to Ipswich residents. Another factor in the 
growth rate is the in-migration of families. This shows no appreciable increase. 
New house construction shows no remarkable increase; approximately forty 
housing starts in 1977. 

The following Chart shows the declining enrollment for Grades K-6: 

Year (October 1) K-6 Enrollment 

1969 1586 

1970 1578 

1971 1547 

1972 1486 

1973 1484 

1973 1449 

1975 1337 

1976 1231 

1977 1106 

Reductions in Force — The School Committee has delegated the 
Superintendent of Schools with conducting a Staff Needs Assessment, and after 
much study and analysis, the Superintendent of Schools made the following 
recommendations which were accepted and voted by the Ipswich School 
Committee. 

Reduction in Force (Teachers) Savings 

One (1) Elementary Teaching Position $ 9,000 

One (50%) Kindergarten Teaching Position 4,500 

One (1) High School English Teaching Position 16,832 

One (1) High School Science Teaching Position 11,235 

Total $41,567 

The recommended budget reflects this $41,567. 

The reports from the Principals of the Schools and the Supervisors list the 
accomplishments of the last year and the progress of the school. 

I extend to the members of the School Committee my sincere appreciation for 
the many hours they spend for Ipswich education. 

I extend to the Administrators, Teachers, Custodians, Secretaries, Cafeteria 
workers and all others, my sincere appreciation for their excellent cooperation. 
Finally, I extend to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Police, Highway, 
Fire Department, and other Town Officials, my sincere appreciation for their 
excellent cooperation with the schools. 

57 




SUPERVISORS 

Ipswich Public Schools 



Left to right: 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal, Doyon School 

John Barranco, Ed. D., Director of Curriculum, K-12 

Marcia J . Fowler, Principal, Burley and Shat swell Schools 

Rear left to right: 

C. Michael Bamford, Acting Principal, Winthrop School 

Joseph J. Battaglio, Director of Pupil Personnel Services 

Donald X. McLaughlin, Acting Principal, Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal, Ipswich High School 



58 



PAUL F. DOYON 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., Principal 

Doyon School continues to serve the town as its newest school, completing 
thirteen years as part of the system. Enrollments continue to fall. In January the 
enrollment was 479 falling to 449 students by December, resulting in the reduction 
of one kindergarten section. 

Organization 

Doyon School continues to be the only school that houses seven grades, 
Kindergarten through Grade 6, with two sections of Kindergarten, three Learning 
Centers and three sections of Grades 1 through 6. 

Curriculum 

Doyon provides a standard curriculum with emphasis placed on basic skills of 
Reading, Mathematics, and the Language Arts. In addition, instruction is 
provided in Science, Health, Social Studies, Physical Education, Vocal Music, 
Instrumental Music and Art. Good citizenship skills and manners are also 
encouraged. 

Personnel 

A staff of 33 full and part time professionals provide service to the children at 
Doyon. Twenty-four of this staff are tenured with one tenure candidate. 

A service staff of eighteen includes seven kitchen employees, three teacher 
aides, three part time lunch aides, two full time custodians, one part time 
custodian, a part time nurse and a school secretary. 

In June of this year, Mrs. Margaret Doucet, Remedial Reading Teacher, 
completed twenty-four years of service and she is now enjoying a well earned 
retirement. 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 
Enrollment as of October 1, 1977 — 691 

The academic year saw the opening of our alternative school at the Notre Dame 
Novitiate. This facility, which was funded under a government grant, is staffed by 

59 



two full time teachers and several part time high school teachers. Fifteen pupils 
are being serviced by this program. 

By some phenomenon the high school enrollment has increased substantially 
and projected enrollments indicate 700 plus students for the next three years. 

Provision for introducing the Arts to our students was made this year by the 
addition of a required course in Unified Arts which all freshmen must take. 

The English elective program for the sophomore year has been eliminated, and 
in its place a required basic program in English composition, reading and literature 
has been instituted. Space limits further explanations of new programs in Science, 
Health, Physical Education, Civics and Business. Our Music Program has vastly 
improved and much credit must be given to our instructors. 

Through the efforts of our Curriculum Coordinator, Mrs. Lyn Huttunen, our 
school's programs have received substantial amounts of federal money. 

The physical facility is still operating between 70 and 90 hours weekly, which is 
as it should be. However, we are still sadly lacking in library space and cannot 
accommodate any more than 35 students at a given time. Hopefully, this situation 
will be corrected in the near future. Storage space is desperately needed. 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES 



Abigail Baker Adams 

Bradley Robert Amundsen 

Ronald Gordon Baldinelli 

Kathleen Ball 

Joseph Alexander Barkowski 
*Lois Gayle Beckwith 

Paul Joseph Birmingham, Jr. 

Andrea Katherine Boland 

Deborah Ann Borgatti 
*Terry S. Bouranis 

David J. Brigham 
t*Denise Marie Brockelbank 
*Jessica Louise Bucklin 
*Martha Ann Bucklin 

Susan Mae Burke 

James Edward Campbell 

Diane Marie Carolan 
t*Laurel Beth Casali 
*James Sheldon Castantini 

Michael Charles Cole 

Norman Richard Arthur Colter 
t*Catherine Avis Comeau 
*Diana Lee Comeau 

Susan Ann Como 
*Melissa Lee Constantine 

Kathryn Marie Crawford 



*James Robert Davis 

Phillip William Demakis 
*Daniel Patrick Desmond 

Rebecca Lynne Dobson 

Timothy Clark Drumm 
t* Donald David Dupray 
*Christine Marie Eaton 
*Paul James Eby 

Donna Maria Ellis 

Thomas H. Esperson 

Donna Maria Farina 
*Linda Gene Fidrocki 

William Roger Fiske 
*Colleen Ann Flynn 
Theresa Marie Foley 

Janet Tina Klimaszewski Foote 

Lisa Anne Foote 

* Susan Pip pa Forman 

* Stephen Michael Foustoukos 
Brenda Lee Fowler 

Carole Dianne Francis 
t* Scott Robert Freeman 

* Martha Davis Frost 
*Lucinda Bradlee Gahm 

Geri Marie Gajewski 
t*Ellen L. Galanis 



60 



*Mark William Geist 

Judith Ann George 
Thomas Mark Gerrish 

Diane Reed Graffum 

Douglas A. Hancock 

Michael Joseph Hart 
t* Martin Edward Heigh 
*Andrew John Hickling 

Thomas William Horsman 
t* Deborah Lee Howard 

* Sally J. Hulbert 
Mark Stuart Jacobson 
Peter Allen Jean 
Jessica Michelle Johnson 
Jeffrey George Jones 
Mark Leslie Jones 

*Kaoru Marsha Julian 
Brian Joseph Kelley 
Bozena Theresa Kawa 

* Samuel Bartow Kimball 
Paula Grace Kelley 
Scott Bickford Ladd 
Harry Lampropoulos 

* Scott Russel Landry 
t* Deborah Lane 

Linda Marie Lavoie 
Nancy Jean Lees 
Marc Gaetan Lemire 
t*Aidan Ernest Forbes Lloyd 

* Douglas Alan Mackey 

* Joanne Frances Mackey 
*Robert James Mackey 

t*Michael James Manning 
*Gail Susan Marcaurelle 

Dana Markos 
*George Louis Markos 

Lorelei J. Martel 

Marie Ann Martin 

Francis X. Masse 

Richard Lee Mastrangelo 

David McCarthy 

Jacqueline Norma McCarthy 

Mark Floyd McDonald 
*Kevin David McElhinney 
*Martin F. McGrath, Jr. 

Susan Margaret McSweeney 
*John Edington Meers 

Thomas P. Melling 
*James Scott Michaud 
Teresa A. Murawski 

Heidi Marie Murray 



Judith A. Nicoll 

*Lyn Ann Nokes 

*F. James Nolan 
t*Kathy Ann Paganis 
Sharon Alma Pappas 
Patricia Ann Pascucelli 

* Susan Foster Paul 
*Elaine Joy Pendexter 

Bruce Nicholas Peters 

* Brian E. Phaneuf 
t*Chester Paul Piechowiak 

* Patricia Ann Putur 
*Laura Lee Radicky 

Anne Scott Richards 

Matthew Earl Richards 
TPeter M. Ross 

Cindy M. Sheppard 
*Jeffrey Michael Sheppard 

Roland F. Sheppard, Jr. 
*Lucinda Ann Schreuer 
*Elaine Patricia Siemasko 

David Donald Simard 

Tami Barbara Simons 

Bruce Alan Sinclair 

Timothy L. Sklarz 

Jeffrey Bryan Smith 

Kevin Michael Smith 
"■Josephine Mary Soroka 
*Deborah Ann Tabor 

John Gardner Thatcher 

Denise Louise Thibault 

John Jean Tougas 
*John James Tsoutsouras 
*Linda Lee Visser 

Rebecca Ann Vose 

Eric E. Wade 

Michael Edwin Wade 

David William Weagle 
*Meg Terese Whiston 

Kathi Marie White 

Kathy Ann Whynot 
*Paula Mary Wickstrom 
*Cheryl Ann Williams 
*Jennifer Elizabeth Wile 
*Cynthia Ann Wilson 

Pamela Jean Wilson 

Gary Adam Wojtonik 

Robert Obear Woodbury, III 

Karen Ann Young 
*Bette Zeroulias 

Nicholas George Zeroulias 

Patrice Melanie Zervas 



* Honors 

^National Honor Society 



61 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Donald X. McLaughlin, Acting Principal 
ENROLLMENT 
The enrollment figures for the 1977-1978 school year are as follows: 



Grade 7 


192 


Grade 8 


219 


TOTAL 


411 



PROGRAMS AND COURSES 

In accordance with the regulations established by Chapter 622 of the State 
Laws, all of our course offerings are now coeducational. The major changes 
occurred in Home Economics. Industrial Arts, and Physical Education. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

We are very pleased with the new lockers which were installed this year on the 
main and second floor. They have greatly enhanced the appearance of the 
corridors. Hopefully, the forthcoming budget will allow us to complete the 
project. 

IN MEMORIUM 

We were all saddened in December by the death of a friend and fellow 
professional. James McDonough. May his soul rest in peace. 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

C. Michael Bamford, Acting Principal 

The Winthrop School is an intermediate school housing four classes of grade 
four, four classes of grade five and five classes of grade six. At the end of the year 
the enrollment at Winthrop was 316 students. One half of the student body is 
bussed to school. 

The school day is 6 hours and 15 minutes. Class "A" lunches are provided by 
the school cafeteria. 

The Winthrop School provides a standard elementary school curriculm and 
includes instruction in art. music and physical education. Instrumental music 

62 



lessons are provided and the chorus meets twice a week. The band and the chorus 
perform at concerts twice yearly. 

Instruction for children with learning disabilities is provided in a Learning 
Center staffed by two full-time specialists and an aide. 

A Title I ESEA Project in remedial reading and mathematics provides for a 
director in each area and trained aides to assist children needing help in these 
areas. The Title I Parents Advisory Council is an active and important part of the 
project. The Winthrop Parents Advisory Council meets monthly and is also an 
active and interesting part of the school program. 

In addition to the classroom teachers, the staff includes vocal music, 
instrumental music and art specialists, a full-time physical education teacher, a 
part-time librarian, two full-time learning disablilies specialists, a full-time 
guidance counselor, a consulting psychologist, a part-time speech therapist, a 
part-time occupational therapist, a part-time diagnostician. A nurse, a secretary, 
two full-time custodians, three full-time cafeteria workers, a part-time cafeteria 
cashier, two part-time lunchroom aides completes the staff. 

Many of the staff members are actively engaged in post graduate work and in 
area committees and boards in various areas of education, guidance and 
environmental activities. The entire staff is involved in scheduled workshops in 
the area of curriculum development in the various disciplines. 

Many civic, private and church groups avail themselves of the opportunities to 
use our facilities and equipment after school, evenings and on weekends. During 
the entire year, including the summer, our kitchen facilities were used in preparing 
meals for our senior citizens. 

In December 1977, Mr. Samuel B. Levy retired from his position as principal of 
the Winthrop School after fifteen years of service with the Ipswich Public 
Schools, first as a classroom teacher and then as principal. Mr. Charles Michael 
Bamford was appointed as acting principal for the balance of the school year. 



BURLEY AND 
SHATSWELL SCHOOLS 

Marcia Fowler, Principal 

ENROLLMENT 

Burley School — Grades Kindergarten through Three — 204 Students 
Shatswell School — Grades Kindergarten through Three — 151 Students 



ORGANIZATION 



Burley School Shatswell School 



Kindergarten Two sessions Two sessions 

Grade One Two classes Three classes 

63 



Grade Two 


Two classes 


Two classes 


Grade Three 


Three classes 


One class 


Learning Center 




One 



Classes are grouped heterogeneously and children receive instruction in all 
areas of basic skills development from their classroom teacher. Special instruction 
and assistance is also provided for students by personnel who are specialists in the 
areas of art, music, physical education, remedial reading, specific learning 
disabilities, speech and occupational therapy. 

Facility in the basic skills is stressed. Opportunities for cultural enrichment are 
provided. Involvement in library skills and a wide range of library related inquiry 
activities are an integral part of the Burley and Shatswell Schools primary school 
programs. Awakening and fueling a lifelong curiosity for learning and mastering 
the skills through which this can take place is the goal around which all efforts 
revolve. 



DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM 

Lyn Huttunen 

During the year of 1977, the personnel of the Ipswich Public Schools continued 
to give dedicated attention to our curriculum in order to provide quality education 
for the children. Among the many accomplishments during the year are the 
following: 

1. Career education service was provided to high school students through a 
computer that linked student interests, needs and talents to suggested career 
avenues and through a job placement service whereby students could pursue 
an understanding of jobs in career areas of their choice. 

2. Our Ipswich Environmental and Civic Action Project continued to flourish 
with many teachers and children utilizing the Mile Lane Site for environmental 
study. IECAP also laid the ground work for a Youth Conservation Corp that 
will provide employment opportunities for youth this summer as well as 
upgrade the Mile Lane Site for future environmental activities. In addition, a 
new unit of study has been developed for children in grades 3 and 4 that focuses 
on the environment. 

3. A sequential and graded list of spelling words, rules and instruction techniques 
has been developed for grades 2 through 8 and is currently being implemented 
in order to upgrade the ability of our students to spell correctly. 

4. Our Right-to-Read effort has included a thorough needs assessment K-12, 
followed by mini-courses for personnel in the teaching of reading and a task 
force approach to implementing the goals of Right-to-Read. This task force 
includes community representatives as well as teachers and administrators. 

5. A more structured English course was designed and instituted this fall in order 
to focus on specific skill needs of students at the high school. 

6. The Intermediate Math Objectives for grades 4-8 were revised in accord with 
teacher recommendations, new text book references added and sample tests 

64 



designed by teachers correlated to the objectives added. 

7. We were able to introduce an alternative high school program entitled Project 
OPEN through competitive funding for a Federal grant. This project is 
designed to offer students an opportunity to upgrade skills and to attain course 
credit through new approaches to curriculum. A large part of the program 
focuses on career awareness and goal setting for better understanding of the 
decision making process. 

As this is my last year of service in the Ipswich Public Schools, I wish to take 
the opportunity to express my deep appreciation to the many dedicated 
administrators, teachers, counselors, nurses and support staff with the school 
system and to the members of the community who have so willingly served on 
advisory committees, curriculum sub-committees and our task forces. 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Joseph J . Battaglio, Director 

Children receiving services under Chapter 766 still represent a sizeable 
proportion of the school population. A per school breakdown follows: 

High School 64 

Junior High School 56 

Burley 26 

Shatswell 32 

Winthrop 51 

Doyon 94 



TOTAL 323 

Adding to this total are children in the pre-school age category (ages 3-5) for 
whom services must be provided, and children in placements outside the system. 
The numbers are eight and fourteen respectively, for a grand total of 345.* 

The slight decline from last year's figure at this time (368) is probably 
attributable to the reduction of unnecessary referrals; but the percentage figure 
continues to represent a significant segment of the school population (15.54%). 

Of immediate concern is the incidence of pupils placed in programs and schools 
outside of Ipswich. No school system can provide all the program options 
mandated under Chapter 766. Outside placements are the inevitable result. 
Inevitable too is the impact on the school budget in deficits and cost overruns, 
since there is no way to plan in advance for placements resulting from new cases. 
The problem is common to every school system. On the North Shore, staggering 
deficits are being reported by most cities and towns. 

While conclusive remedies are hard to come by, certain proposals to ameliorate 
the problem will be made in the Pupil Personnel Services budget. 

* All figures as of January 1, 1978 

65 



EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED TO MINORS 



Boys 
Girls 



7/1/76 - 6/30/77 



Age 

14 - 16 

12 
13 



Age 
16 - 18 

22 
24 



Total 

34 
37 



ENROLLMENT CHART BY 
GRADES 1972 - 1977 



Grade 


1972. 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


K 


171 


165 


191 


156 


138 


106 


1 


183 


197 


182 


188 


175 


148 


2 


220 


198 


194 


184 


184 


158 


3 


250 


208 


200 


181 


174 


174 


4 


214 


242 


197 


196 


180 


167 


5 


224 


219 


237 


191 


183 


179 


6 


203 


232 


224 


236 


197 


174 


7 


213 


202 


223 


220 


225 


193 


8 


224 


214 


201 


223 


214 


219 


9 


200 


177 


175 


171 


174 


189 


10 


213 


171 


180 


163 


169 


182 


11 


210 


174 


167 


173 


144 


172* 


12 


177 


180 


177 


163 


168 


148** 


P.G. 


1 


1 




4 


1 




Sp. Ed. 


25 


4 


8 


5 






TOTALS 


2728 


2584 


2556 


2454 


2326 


2209 



*Figure includes 13 at Project O. P.E.N. 
**Figure includes 2 at Project O.P.E.N. 



Totals 



ENROLLMENT CHART 
OCTOBER 3, 1977 



Grade 


K 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total 


Doyon 


41 


56 


64 76 69 71 67 444 


Burley 


33 


42 


49 73 197 


Shatswell 


32 


50 


45 25 152 


Winthrop 






98 108 107 313 


Jr. High 






193 219 412 


Sr. High 






189 182 159 146 676 


O.P.E.N. 






13 2 15 



106 148 158 174 167 179 174 193 219 189 182 172 148 2209 

66 



SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Constable, Charles Gianakakis 
Board Chairman, Edward Paquin 

The year 1977 was a critical year for the shellfish resource of the Town. A lack 
of seed during the past three seasons reduced the number of legal-sized clams (2" 
or over), to a point when the number of commercial clammers was reduced to 
approximately 1/5 the number working the flats during the previous two years. 
Most part-time and summer clammers either found other employment or gave up 
their efforts early in the summer months as they found it nearly impossible to 
make a reasonable income from clamming. The outlook for 1978 does not appear 
to be much better than 1977, however, nature and man-directed projects may help 
to provide a stronger resource in the period 2-3 years in the future. 

A moderate amount of seed was produced and remained in the flats during this 
past summer and fall. An experimental semi-floating mesh net measuring 300 
square feet was very successful in catching seed in the bed below it. 
Unfortunately, since it takes on the average, 2 years for a clam to grow to legal 
size, most of the seed is a year and a half away from the point where recreational 
or commercial diggers will be able to take advantage of it. 

In efforts to protect the seed from predators and improve the shellfish beds, two 
major projects were undertaken this year. The first was a predator-control project 
underway from the end of July to the beginning of October. Nine local diggers and 
college students were employed to rake green algae off the flats, catch and destroy 
green crabs and horseshoe crabs, and ditch and drain areas that have previously 
been unproductive as*a result of lack of drainage and or excessive silt build-up. 
The second major project was the result of a C.E.T.A. grant, which began 
October 1st and ends this February. Eleven previously unemployed men (local 
and non-local), have been raking and burying mussels, constructed a ramp at 
Crane's boat house, improved the access and road leading to Patterson's Island, 
and during bad weather have been constructing crab-pots for use this coming 
summer as an additional method of protecting the clam seed. 

In summary, we have found it difficult to deal with nature, however, we feel we 
have made real progress in the area of predator control and shellfish-bed 
improvement. For this type of effort to have long-range positive results it must be 
worked at every year to guarantee that the predators do not destroy what nature 
gives us as a shellfish resource in the form of clam-spat (seed clam). 



TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 

Fiscal years 1977 and 1978 have seen increasing growth in the area of litigation. 
Because the Legislature continues to pass laws creating new rights and remedies 
for increasingly numerous interest groups, this trend is expected to continue for 
the foreseeable future. The Supreme Judicial Court has stated that Municipal 
Immunity will be abolished by the Court in January 1979 if the Legislature does 
not abolish or severely limit this immunity during 1978. This may well result in the 

67 



Town of Ipswich, and all of its employees, being responsible for all of its negligent 
and wrongful acts, just as any private citizen is legally liable. Unfortunately this 
will inevitably increase the quantity of litigation involving the Town. 

Among major items resolved in favor of the Town in Essex Superior Court in 
1977 were suits involving the Town Manager's position and a suit begun in 1974 
challenging the legality of a compulsory binding arbitration award to one of the 
municipal labor unions with which the Town negotiates. There was also a 
disturbing increase in the quantity of appeals of real estate tax assessments to the 
Appelate Tax Board in Boston, over twenty in 1977. Most of these cases were 
settled with the participation and cooperation of the Board of Assessors. 
However, litigation of this nature threatens to continue to increase until the entire 
Town undergoes a complete revaluation. 



TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 
Comparative Vital Statistics recorded for the past four years: 



Births 

Deaths 

Marriages 

All the births recorded, with one exception, were to Ipswich residents (57 female, 
62 male). Five births took place in Ipswich. Of the total number of deaths 
recorded, 75 were residents (33 female, 42 male). The age of the oldest resident 
was 100 years, 2 months, 14 days; the youngest 1 months, 12 days. 

1976 1977 



974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


121 


107 


128 


120 


138 


124 


115 


106 


123 


138 


127 


137 



DOG LICENCES 








Males 




688 


539 


Females 




54 


45 


Spayed Females 




537 


392 


Kennels 




14 


11 


Total 




1293 


987 


CLAM PERMITS 








Residents 




397 


341 


Non-resident Daily 




79 


53 


Non-resident Yearly 




176 


116 


Total 




652 


510 


REGISTERED VOTERS (as of December 31, 1977) 








Precinct Democrats Republicans Unenrolled 


Total 




I 284 503 


610 


1397 




II 552 585 


863 


2000 




III 320 406 


739 


1465 




IV 499 432 


869 


1800 




Total 1655 1926 


3081 


6662 





68 



ELECTIONS (Town) 

The Annual Meeting for the election of Town Officers was held in accordance 

with the warrant on Monday, May 9, 1977 from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The voting 

machine in Precinct I registered 2820 ballots cast, in Precinct II 3444, in Precinct 

III 2412, and in Precinct IV 3306, for a total of 11982 votes cast in the four 

precincts. 



Prec I Prec II Prec III Prec IV Total 



MODERATOR 
Harold E. Shively 
Blanks 
Total 



SELECTMEN 
Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 
Cornelius A. Cleary 
Leon Haserlat 
Norbert V. White 
Blanks 
Total 

CONSTABLE 
Richard B. Finnegan 
John J. Michon, Sr. 
Blanks 
Total 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
M. Patricia Manning 
Deanna S. Cross 
Blanks 
Total 



A special Election to fill the vacancy on the Board of Selectmen left by the death 
of Norbert V. White was held on Monday, December 12, 1977 from 10:00 to 8:00 
p.m. 

Prec I Prec II Prec III Prec IV Total 
SELECTMEN 
John Griffin 
Carmen Quint Hebbel 
John A. Pechilis 
Blanks 
Total 426 557 304 660 1947 



389 


459 


324 


397 


1569 


81 


115 


78 


154 


428 


470 


574 


402 


551 


1997 


259 


306 


233 


364 


1162 


174 


226 


188 


262 


850 


42 


69 


39 


82 


232 


322 


386 


248 


253 


1209 


143 


161 


96 


141 


541 


940 


1148 


804 


1102 


3994 


167 


238 


143 


169 


717 


246 


266 


202 


321 


1035 


57 


70 


57 


61 


245 


470 


574 


402 


551 


1997 


378 


459 


308 


431 


1576 


304 


357 


233 


267 


1161 


258 


332 


263 


404 


1257 


940 


1148 


804 


1102 


3994 



151 


150 


67 


141 


509 


128 


152 


80 


137 


497 


146 


254 


155 


379 


934 


1 


1 


2 


3 


7 



69 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Frank Story. Director 

I hereby submit the annual report of the Office of Veteran's Services for the 
Town of Ipswich. The present veterans laws in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts provide for two major programs. One is for services to inform and 
assist veterans and their dependents relative to their rights and entitlements under 
the statutes enacted by the Federal. State and local governments. The second 
program renders financial assistance in time of need under Chapter 115 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, as amended. The numbers of cases assisted under 
Chapter 1 15 are reported on a monthly basis, as follows: January - 46. February - 
43. March - 54. April - 53, May - 39. June - 39. July - 21, August- 35. September - 
33. October - 34. November - 42. December - 40. The expenditure under this 
program is reimbursed 50^ by the State. 

The Service Program is by far the most active program, constituting 859r of our 
work load. There is no financial participation from the community relating to this 
program. Services rendered through this program are as follows: 7 Request 
Pertaining to Military Records from Adjutant General's Office. 1 Conversation of 
GI Insurance. 2 Application for Cash Surrender Value. 2 Claim for Life 
Insurance. 68 Annual Questionnaire Card. 7 Bonus Application. 1 Card for 
Medical Service outside VA Clinic. 12 Application for Champva. 23 Application 
for Champus Payment. 3 Application for ID Card. 11 Request for Abatement 
Form. 15 Returned Treasury Check. 7 Social Security Checks Returned. 67 Rx to 
VA Clinic. 23 Appointments for VA Clinic. 18 Social Security Application for DA. 
16 Application for SSL 1 Application for Wheelchair. 14 Referral to VA Facility, 4 
Mass. Income Tax Return. 15 Request for Military records from St. Louis. 5 
Review of Discharge or Separation. 13 Application for Headstone. 27 Request for 
Change of Address. 28 Request for Medical Information from Claimant's 
Records. 4 Application for DMD Benefits. 22 Application for Compensation or 
Pension. 3 Application for Pension Change. 1 1 Income-Net Worth & Employment 
Status. 10 Application for Widow's Pension. 2 Employment Questionnaire. 24 
Request for Approval of School Attendance. 1 Declaration of Marital Status. 8 
Examination for Housebound Status. 2" Statement of Income & Net Worth. 4" 
Statement in Support of Claim. 3 Request for Information Concerning Family 
Unusual Medical Expenses. 1 Enrollment Certification. 3 Program of Education. 
4 Request for Change of Program. 61 Power of Attorney. 15 Eligibility Certificate. 
3 Designation of Beneficiary & Optional Settlement. 

Compensations and pensions received, and still effective, totaled S5 18.628.00. 
VA hospitalizations saved the Town S68.750.00. S103 .000.00 was realized from 
SSI. The Education Program saved S 18.380.00 in 1977. For Federal money 
received, there is no State or Town participation. The above represents an 
accrued saving of S708.758.00 for the year 1977. Our service to the Veteran and 
his dependents is a record of which we are proud. Our well-trained staff makes for 
an efficient operation in meeting the needs of our Veteran population. 



70 



V 



WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENTS 



James Chase, Engineer 

WATER DIVISION: 

Henry J . Chouinard, Foreman 

Once again the Town of Ipswich experienced a severe water shortage and once 
again the Town weathered the crisis. Heavy rain, water from the Town of 
Hamilton and noticeable civic efforts at conservation saw us through. In an effort 
to correct this continuing problem, Town Meeting appropriated funds both for the 
development of a well site off Essex Road near Lake man's Lane and for further 
well exploration throughout Town. Development of the Essex Road well site is 
progressing slowly and exploration has revealed several potential sites at Fellows 
Road and in the Willowdale State Forest. Hopefully, these efforts will lead to a 
solution of our water shortage problem. Meanwhile everyone is asked to conserve 
water. 

On June 24, 1977 the Drinking Water Regulations of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts were revised. Changes in the regulations were brought about by 
the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 which Congress enacted in a desire to 
improve on the quality of water consumed by the American public. In particular 
we are now required to monitor and analyse the microbiological, inorganic 
chemical, organic chemical, radionuclide and turbidity levels in our drinking 
water. All analyses must be reported to the Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering. If any analyses exceeds its maximum allowable level, the public 
must be notified and corrective measures satisfactory to the D.E.Q.E. must be 
taken. Needless to say, the new regulations are much more encompassing than 
those formerly in effect. While their intent is to improve on the quality of water, 
the Ipswich Water Department wishes that they could have improved on the 
quantity as well. 



1975 



1976 



1977 



New Meters Installed: 


30 


48 


27 


Meters Replaced: 


149 


96 


71 


Services Turned Off: 


123 


112 


104 


Services Turned On: 


124 


112 


129 


New Services: 


10 


44 


26 


Services Discontinued: 


2 


2 





Hydrants Installed: 





5 


8 


Hydrants Replaced: 








4 


New Water Mains Installed: 





1,716' 


750' 


Total Length of Mains: 


389,697' 


391,413' 


392,163' 


WATER SERVICES 








Metered Services: 


3,072 


3,120 


3,147 


Unmetered Services: 


142 


131 


131 


Summer Services: 


172 


172 


172 


WATER USAGE 








Dow's Reservoir 


212,322,700 


139,374,200 


187,805,000 


Brown's Well 


132,181,150 


155,735,591 


106,441,000 


Winthrop Wells 


75,181,188 


105,246,842 


66,208,000 


Mile Lane Well 


32,310,000 


26,910,000 


21,060,000 


Purchased from Hamilton 


00 


21,925,000 


9,479,000 



71 



Total Water Usage 451,995,058 427,266,633 390,993,000 

Highest Day: 2/19/75 2,797,000 

Highest Day: 6/25/76 2,457,844 

Highest Day: 7/6/77 1,895,000 



SEWER DIVISION 

James J. Tebo, Chief Operator 

Construction of new sewer mains to Dornell Road, Avery Street and Currier 
Park were completed. Construction of 1,400 feet of sewer main on County Road 
between Southern Heights and the Cable Memorial Hospital was begun. 

On February 17, 1977, the vacuum filter at our new Wastewater Treatment 
Facility on Fowler's Lane went on line and on that date the plant became fully 
operational. 

1975 1976 1977 

Sewage Treated Daily 

(Average Gallons) 551,885 500,000* 993,000 
Total Sewage Treated 

(Gallons) 153,424,000** 183,000,000* 362,375,000 

Highest Day - 3/12/77 2,729,000 

New Connections 56 24 40 

Total Connections 1,112 1,136 1,176 

Chlorine Used (Tons) 15.30 12.10 5.49 

*Estimated 

**January 1, 1975 - October 5, 1975 Only 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Cathleen McGinley, Director 

The year 1977 at the Drop In Center has been our most successful with many 
new programs being initiated and a continual increase in membership. The tragic 
fire which destroyed the South Parish House (built in 1837), the home of the 
teenage Drop In Center for the past five years, is a great loss to everyone in the 
community. We must now all work together over the coming year to locate a new 
Drop In Center and continue to strengthen our programs for the youth of Ipswich. 
Through the generosity of many people within the Community, many 
contributions to the Drop In Center Fund have been received. Donations of 
furniture, pool tables, ping pong tables, television, and various equipment is 
deeply appreciated by the Youth Commission and everyone involved in helping 
the teenagers with their "New Beginning." 

In return for the generous support of the Drop In Center by the townspeople, 

72 



the teenagers have performed numerous civic and community projects during the 
past year, which include the following: 

Delivery of Town Reports 
Town Wide Cleanup 
Sweetheart Fair 
Turkey Dinner for the Elderly 
Rent A Kid Program 

Major activities the Youth Commission has been responsible for over the past 
year are as follows: 

11 Dances & Concerts 

1 Block Dance 
6 Movies 

2 Dance Marathons 

6 Trips to Baseball, Basketball 

Hockey & Tennis Games in Boston 

Ski trip to New Hampshire 

Trip to Fanueil & Quincy Hall Markets 
4 Ice Skating trips 

12 Trips to McDonalds & Dinner nights 
Summer Cookout 

Everyone involved with our Youth Programs and connected with the Teenage 
Drop In Center are truly grateful for such overwhelming community support 
during the year 1977. 

"Children, are the worlds most valuable resource and its hope for the 
future." 'JFK 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1977 the Board held twenty-three hearings on requests for variances or 
special exceptions from the Zoning by-law. Of these, fourteen were granted, eight 
were denied, and in one, a variance was found to be not necessary. 

A new Zoning By-law was adopted and became effective in 1977. One of the 
effects of the new By-law is to reduce the number of zoning districts from twelve 
to four, plus a Wetlands District which overlays the other four districts. 

After the Annual Town Meeting, James Theodosopoulos was reappointed to a 
five-year term on the Board and Mary Fosdick and John R. Verani were appointed 
as Associate members. At its organizational meeting, the Board elected James 
Theodosopoulos and Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. as Chairman and Vice-Chairman, 
respectively. Later in the year, Michael Pascucelli resigned from the Board and 
Mary Fosdick was appointed in his place. Robert Macklin was then appointed as 
an Associate member. 

73 



During 1977, the following 
retired, died: 



DEATHS 



persons, either in active duty with the Town, or 



1. 


Henry Minichello 


Electric Department 


1/13/77 


2. 


Richard Sheppard 


Shellfish Constable 


2/02/77 


3. 


Arthur Moon 


Shellfish Constable 


2/24/77 


4. 


Alfred Langmaid 


Police Officer 


3/09/77 


5. 


Joseph Arcisz 


Police Officer 


3/15/77 


6. 


Robert Cottam 


Finance Committee 


4/09/77 


7. 


J. Perry Smith 


Finance Committee 


4/20/77 


8. 


John Bialek 


Board of Selectmen 


6/08/77 


9. 


Charles Pickard 


Recreation/Parks Committee 


6/30/77 


10. 


William Hayes II 


FinCorrvSchool Com + Town Counsel 


7/01/77 


11. 


Eleanor Richardson 


School Nurse 


7/05/77 


12. 


Walter Jewett 


Electric Department 


7/14/77 


13. 


Kennard V. Damon 


Town Accountant 


8/28/77 


14. 


Robert Player 


Cemetery Department 


9/06/77 


15. 


Norbert V. White 


Board of Selectmen 


10/15/77 


16. 


James McDonough 


School Department 


12/09/77 


17. 


Mary Evans 


School Department 


12/15/77 








6 




74 



8 





10 





11 



12 





13 



14 





15 



16 



NO PICTURE 
AVAILABLE 




17 



75 



IPSWICH AT A GLANCE 



Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Essex County 

Founded 1633 — Incorporated 1634 

6th Congressional District 

Governor: Michael S. Dukakis 

U.S. Senator: Edward M. Kennedy 

U.S. Senator: Edward Brook 

U.S. Representative: Michael J. Harrington 

Ipswich is in the 3rd Senatorial District (State) 

State Senator: Willian L. Saltonstall 

Ipswich is in the 2nd Essex District (County) 

Representative in General Court: David J. Lane 

County Commissioners: John McKean 

Katherine M. Donovan 

Edward H. Cahill 



Government: 

Location: 

Area: 
Geographical Center: 

Population: 
Transportation: 

Tax Rate: 

Total Assessed Value: 

Miles of Roads: 

Fire Department: 

Police Department: 



Water: 

Sewer: 

Electricity: 

Gas: 

Recreational Facilities: 



Zoning: 



Selectmen/Town Manager Charter (State Law) — 

New England Town Meeting 

Located on Massachusetts' North Shore — 35 Miles 

N.E. of Boston — Driving Time 45 minutes 

33.35 Square miles — 21,344 acres 

Pedrick House, corner of Jeffrey's Neck Road and 

Ocean Drive 

11,551 (1976) 

Boston & Maine R.R. — Frequent Rail Service — 

Train time to Boston 50 min. — U.S. Route 1, U.S. 

Route 1A — Harbor Facilities — Taxi Services 

$71.00 All homes are assessed at approximately 65% 

of fair market value 

1977 Real Estate and Personal Property $74,728,000 

Approximately 89 

Full-time 18 firemen — 30 call personnel — 

equipment includes one 100' Aerial ladder truck and 

one new Forestry Mini Pumper 

Full-time 21 policemen — 18 auxiliaries — 4 radio 

equipped cruisers — 1 inspector — 1 Dog Officer 

with radio equipped van 

Available to Entire Town 

Available to Part of Town 

Municipal Plant available to entire Town 

Available to 75% of Town 

Supervised Playgrounds — Summer Swimming 

Instruction — Tennis Courts — Softball Diamonds 

— Baseball Diamonds — Public Beaches on 
Seashore — Ponds for Ice Skating (some are lighted) 

— .9 hole Golf Course — Boat Club — Yacht Club 

— Wildlife Sanctuary — Salt & Fresh Water Fishing 

— Movie Theatre — 16 Lane Bowling Alley — Pool 
& Billiards — Golden Age Club — Active Youth 
Commission 

Protection by comprehensive zoning and planning 
regulations to insure controlled growth of residential, 
commercial and industrial area 



76 



Housing: 
Schools: 



Churches: 
Medical Facilities: 



Shopping: 



Public Library: 
Health: 

News: 
Industry: 



Three Projects (one under construction) 144 units 

provided for low income families and Elderly 

Citizens 

Four Elementary Schools — Jr. High School — 

High School — Pupil/Teacher Ratio 14.3/1 — Special 

Classes for Retarded or Perceptually Handicapped 

— Kindergartens — Regional Vo-Tech High School 

— Comprehensive program of evening classes for 
adults 

2 Baptist — 3 Catholic — 1 Christian Science — 1 
Congregational — 1 Episcopal — 1 Greek Orthodox 

— 1 Methodist — Russian Orthodox 

21 Physicians — 10 Dentists — 41 Bed Hospital — 
Psychiatric Out-patient Program — Visiting Nurses 

— Convalescent Homes — Medical Center — 
Ambulance Service — 2 Pharmacies ... 2 
Veterinarians 

Downtown Business District — Shopping Center — 

Antique Shops — Apparel Stores — Auto Body & 

Supply Shops — Banks — Beauty Shops (Barber 

Shops & Hair Stylists) — Building Supplies — 

Cleaners — Gift Shops — Grocery Stores (fruit & 

vegetable stands) — Hardware Stores — Jewelers — 

Laundromats — Pharmacies — Restaurants — 

Service Stations — Sport Shops — Variety Stores 

and others 

58,301 volume library — open 6 days a week — 

Micro filmed data — Audio/Visual Equipment 

Dump open 7 days a week — Rubbish Collection 

Weekly — Garbage Collection Weekly in winter, 

twice in summer 

Two weekly Newspapers — Coverage in three daily 

area papers and two radio stations 

Sylvania — Four Major Shellfish Plants — 

Monument Manufacturing — Several Woodworking 

Establishments 



77 



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IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00166 354 5 



78 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



AMBULANCE 6-5500 

POLICE 6-4343 

FIRE 6-4321 

(Ipswich residents dial 6 and 4 digits-all other dial 356 and 4 digits-Area Code is 617) 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen Office, Town Hall (Merle R. Pimentel, Chairman) 6-2262 

Town Manager's Office, Town Hall (George E. Howe) 6-4848 

Accountant, Robert H. Leet, Town Hall 6-3066 

Assessor, Varnum Pedrick, Town Hall 6-4010 

Building Inspector, Ralph Herbert, Town Hall Annex 6-4900 

Cemetery Superintendent, Walter H. Hulbert, Jr 6-3933 

Dog Officer, Dog Pound, Melvin Blaquiere 6-0588 

Electric Manager, Alfred Tobiasz, Electric Light Building 6-4331 

Engineer, James E. Chase, Town Hall Annex 6-5592 

Fire Chief, Theodore Mozdziez 6-4322 

Fire Chief in Charge, Melvin Bowen, Fire Station 6-4322 

Harbormaster, Peter George 6-3820 

Health Agent, 6-4900 

Librarian, Eleanor Crowley, Library 6-4646 

Police Chief, Armand Brouillette, Town Hall 6-4343 

Public Works Director, Armand Michaud, Town Hall 6-5591 

Recreation/Parks Director, James H. Daly, Memorial Building 6-3767 

Town Clerk, Harold G. Comeau, Town Hall Annex 6-4161 

Town Counsel, Charles C. Dalton 6-0106 

Treasurer/Collector, George C. Mourikas, Town Hall Annex 6-3100 

Youth Director, Cathleen McGinley, Memorial Building 6-0312 



SCHOOL SYSTEM 

School Board Chairman, Patricia Manning 6-4436 

School Superintendent, John H. Stella, Payne School 6-2935 

High School Principal, Joseph R. Rogers 6-3137 

Junior High School Principal, 6-3535 

Burley School Principal, Marcia J. Fowler 6-2666 

Doyon School Principal, William E. Waitt, Jr 6-5506 

Shatswell School Principal, Marcia J. Fowler 6-2312 

Winthrop School Principal, 6-2976 

School Nurse 6-5507 

6-3535 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Lawrence J. Pszenny 6-0596 



BOARD, COMMISSION AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 









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Board of Assessors, Varnum Pedrick, Chief 6-4010 

Cemetery Commission, Leon B. Turner 6-2656 

Civil Defense, John R. Harrigan, Director 6-3434 

Commuter Rail Committee, John Vincent, Jr 6-5995 

Conservation Commission, Alexander A. Sweeniejr 

Constable, John J. Michon, Sr 6-2883 

Council on Aging, Virginia Cawthron Poulen : 6-0234 

Economic & Industrial Development Commission, Paul Beswick 6-5624 

Electric Advisory Board, Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr 6-5257 

Growth Policy Committee, George R. Mathey 6-4215 

Government Study Committee, Irving Small 6-2070 

Board of Health, Paul J. Valcour 6-0633 

Historical Commission, John F. Conley 6-2567 

Housing Authority, Jane Bokron, Director 6-2860 

John G. Thatcher, Jr 6-4141 

Industrial Development Financing Authority 

Library Trustees, Phyllis E. Bruce 6-24% 

Mosquito Control Committee, Alice Keenan. 6-4465 

Moderator, Harold E. Shively 6-3997 

Planning Board, John T. Beagan 6-3776 

Police Station Study Committee, George Mathey 6-4215 

Recreation & Parks Committee, John H. Morrow 6-5290 

Registrars of Voters, Barbara J. Rousseau 6-5674 

Shellfish Advisory Board, Edward Paquin 6-5232 

Trust Fund Commissioners, Elton B. McCauseland 6-5925 

Waterways Study Commission, Joseph A. Navarro 6-2034 

Youth Commission, Louis Geoffrion 

Zoning Board of Appeals, James Theodosopoulos 6-2336 



MEETINGS 



DAY & TIME 



PLACE 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Board of Assessors 
Board of Health 
Board of Selectmen 
Cemetery Commission 
Conservation Commission 
Council on Aging 
Economic/Indust. Dev. Comm. 
Finance Committee 
Historical Commission 
Housing Authority 
Indus. Dev. Fin. Authority 
Library Trustees 
Planning Board 
Recreation/Parks Comm. 
School Committee 
Shellfish Advisory Comm. 
Waterways Study Comm. 
Youth Commission 
Zoning Board of Appeals 



2nd Mon. in May 

1st Mon. in May 

Every Monday 

2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 

Every Monday 

1st Mond. ea. mo. 

1st & 3rd Tues., ea. mo. 

1st Wed. ea. mo. 

3rd Mon. ea. mo. 

4th Wed. ea. mo. 

Every Thursday 

2nd Mon. ea. mo. 

3rd Mon. ea. mo. 

Every other Tues. 

1st Tues. ea. mo. 

1st & 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 

1st Wed. ea. mo. 

4th Tues. ea. mo. 

2nd & 4th Tues. ea. mo. 

3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 



Precinct Polling Place 

High School 

Town Hall Annex 

Health Office, Annex 

Town Hall 

Cemetery Office 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Electric Building 

Electric Building 

Town Hall 

Comm. Bldg. Caroline Ave. 

Library 
Town Hall 
Memorial Building 
To Be Announced 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Memorial Building 
Town Hall